FANDOM



CommunitiesEdit

Arguably one of the most important aspects of your empire is the communities that exist within it. These focal points of civilization are the great engine that drives the empire to greater heights of power and influence. Whether a bustling metropolis, a small cabal of mages, or a tribe of nomadic barbarians, it is the communities in an empire that create and sustain its wealth, military forces, and culture.

                There are several aspects to communities that help to determine everything from its defensive capabilities to the number of people it can support. First are the community’s ability scores. Though largely shaped like a character’s ability scores, the community’s ability scores are typically used in a more passive fashion, serving to limit the community’s growth in various areas. Second is the community’s type, which helps to determine what types of jobs are common in the community and its overall focus. Third is the community’s level, which measures how intense and complex the community’s cultural heritage is. Last are the buildings in and around each community which provide places of employment for its residents, facilitating its growth and productivity.

Community LeadersEdit

A community can be assigned a leader, who acts as a mayor or elder of that community. A community leader gains a number of bonus community ability score points equal to ½ of his Leadership ranks plus his Charisma modifier. When he takes office he may assign these points to the community’s ability scores as he sees fit. When he gains more bonus points from increasing his Leadership ranks or Charisma score, he may assign those points as they become available. Once these choices are made, they cannot be changed except as noted here. The bonuses to not go into effect until 1 year after the leader has taken office. If the leader wishes to change his bonus point allocation, his community loses all bonuses he grants for 1 year, after which the new bonus point allocation takes effect.

 

Community Ability ScoresEdit

The community ability scores are listed below. A newly founded level 1 community gets 21 ability score points to distribute among the six abilities. Each ability begins at a 10. Every point beyond 10 costs a cumulative +1 point (so a score of 11 would cost 1 point, but to increase that to a 12 would cost 2 additional points, and to increase it to a 13 would cost 3 more points for a total of 6 points). The ability scores have modifiers just like a character’s ability scores do, and these modifiers are calculated in the same way. So a community with a Resilience score of 13 would have a +1 Resilience modifier.

                After assigning ability scores there are only two methods of improving them: increasing the community’s level and researching ways to improve the community’s various aspects. For more information see Culture & Community Level, and Research.

 

Force (Fce)Edit

Force measures the community's ability to project power against a specific target. This is used in combat, but it also gives an indication of how much muscle power the community has available (such as heavy manual labor). Visible signs of a high Force ability include large numbers of workers or peasants, armed guards, and protective towers. Low Force communities lack these elements.

·         A community's Force modifier is the maximum number of production buildings that it can contain.

·         A community's Force modifier also describes the maximum number of work crews and (separately) military units the community can support.

·         Military communities gain a +2 bonus to either their Force or Mobility score, chosen upon founding.

Mobility (Mby)Edit

Mobility measures a community's ability to move both people and cargo over large distances in a timely fashion. Being able to transport goods is essential to successful trading, and also helps reduce the feeling of isolation that some communities experience.                Nomadic tribes, merchant communities of wagon caravans, or towns with large numbers of mounted troops usually have high Mobility scores. Communities concentrating on fortifying a particular location have lower Mobility scores.

·         A community's Mobility modifier is the maximum number of squares away from the community that can be worked by its citizens. This is known as the community’s area of influence.

·         A community's Mobility modifier also indicates the maximum number of income buildings the community can contain.

·         Military communities gain a +2 bonus to either their Force or Mobility score, chosen upon founding.

 

Resilience (Res)Edit

Resilience measures the ability of a community to withstand physical shocks and how quickly the community recovers from them. Shocks include physical attacks on the community by outside forces as well as all forms of natural disaster. A community's Resilience covers its ability to make repairs to housing and infrastructure after these shocks, as well as any medical facilities it might possess. Visible signs of a community's high Resilience score include stockpiles of food, water, and building materials, medical facilities, and commoners specially tasked to a community's repair and maintenance. Low Resilience communities are those with no emergency stores or supplies or plans for responding to emergencies.

 ·         A community's Resilience modifier is the maximum number of food buildings it can contain and the number of defense buildings it can contain.

 

Learning (Lrn)Edit

Learning measures the amount of knowledge that the community possesses, as well as its ability to assimilate and process new information. The knowledge may be a vast collection of oral folktales, or the collection of old books and artifacts in an arcane sanctum. Learning covers both the community members' intelligence level and the value the community places on learning new information. Visible signs of a high Learning ability include libraries, schools, universities and respect shown to learned individuals.

 ·         A community's Learning modifier is the maximum number of research buildings it can contain.

·         Arcane communities gain a +2 bonus to their Learning score when founded.

 

Awareness (Awa)Edit

Awareness measures how much the community is conscious of physical and social stimuli. It covers the extent to which the community - especially its leaders - notices and responds to external influences. It measures how fast the community recovers from social and spiritual setbacks (in the same way Resilience covers physical setbacks), and it also covers the community's ability to maintain order in times of chaos. Visible signs of a high Awareness ability include town halls, features such as spirit lodges and temples that serve the community's spiritual needs, regular town meetings or heralds bringing news to the people, and strong border patrols.

·         A community's Awareness modifier is the maximum number of culture buildings the community can contain.

·         Religious communities gain a +2 bonus to their Awareness score when founded.

 

Command (Com)Edit

Command measures the level of influence that the community can exert on both its own people and visitors. It covers how the community appears and how persuasive or intimidating it is, particularly in social situations. It also provides a general estimate of the level of commerce that takes place in the community, as well as how much creativity and social interaction goes on among the inhabitants. Visible signs of a high Command score include a clear and visible leadership, obvious wealth, active merchants and markets, and well-populated bars and theaters.

·         A community's Command modifier is the maximum number of happiness buildings the community can contain.

·         A community's Command modifier also describes the maximum number of imperial envoy and settler units it can create.

·         Civilian communities gain a +2 bonus to their Command score when founded.


Community TypeEdit

Communities also have a "class" called the community type. This must be chosen when the community is founded, but the community is able to multiclass as it gains levels. The community's type determines class skills, defense bonus, and culture bonus.

                Unlike with characters, a community's skills aren't typically used in an active manner. Instead they simply represent the community's ability to perform those actions and generally indicate how much of the population focuses in that area. They are most commonly used here as prerequisites for certain buildings. A community’s maximum ranks in a skill equal its level. Cross-class skills still require two points per rank, but otherwise have the same maximum.

                However, another common use for community skills is to determine what goods and services, and what quality of them, are available in the community. For example, a community without ranks in Craft (armorsmithing) would not have custom armor readily available for purchase. The community’s skill rank is the highest level anyone in the community is that specializes in that skill (the specialist’s skill ranks may be higher than the community’s).

 

Civilian Community (Cco)Edit

From the simplest town far from the lines of battle to the sprawl of large cities, civilian populations make the other community types possible. Civilian communities are home to the people responsible for growing food, harvesting lumber, mining minerals, making clothes and trade goods, and a host of other activities essential to the community. Most communities have at least a small civilian population to support the other parts of the community and keep it running smoothly.

                Civilian populations are often made up of the families of those serving in the military or engaged in the community's other pursuits. Some members of the civilian population are retired soldiers, now earning a living as farmers or tradespeople in another profession.

                Civilian communities are usually focused on agriculture, producing trade goods, animal husbandry, logging, mining, and other similar activities. Combat training is kept to a minimum, with most civilians armed only with the tools of their professions. However, a civilian population is far from defenseless, and its people will fiercely defend their homes and livelihoods if attacked. Most are even prepared to lay down their lives to save the rest of the population, if necessary.

                For the most part, while they are often the most social of communities due to the social interactions demanded by trade and their role as the heart of larger communities, most civilian communities prefer to be left alone by outsiders. They are content to live their lives and pursue their professions with the minimum of interference and intervention by both the rest of the population and the outside world. They rely heavily on the military for their defense and will often head to military strongholds for protection in times of conflict.

                Civilian populations are good places for characters to learn new trades or crafts, restock for another adventure, or to simply unwind after a hard campaign. Often more open and hospitable than the other community types, a civilian community could easily be a place for a character to call home.

                Visible signs of a civilian population include farms, mines, businesses, fishing fleets, and other normal indications of habitation.

Civilian Community Skills: Appraise, Craft (all), Diplomacy, Gather Information, Handle Animal, Knowledge (architecture & engineering, geography, history, local, nature, nobility & royalty), Perform (all), Profession (bookkeeper, brewer, cook, farmer, fisherman, guide, herbalist, hunter, innkeeper, lumberjack, miller, miner, porter, rancher, sailor, tanner, teamster, woodcutter), Speak Language, and Survival.

Skill Points per Level: 4 + population.

Defense Bonus: +1 per 4 levels.

Culture Bonus: +1 per 2 levels.

 

Military Community (Mco)Edit

Military communities practice the arts of war and battle as their primary occupation. In some cases, this is as simple as a guard patrol keeping peace in a small village, but often it is a large military force barracked in a community - whether based out of the community, recovering from a nearby campaign, or on their way to a distant one. Regardless of where they are going or where they come from, troops in the city on more than a transitory basis become a part of the population's military community. The role of a military community is usually based around the protection of the community and the surrounding countryside from marauders and enemy forces. In some communities - particularly nomadic ones - the military may concentrate more on attack than defense.

                When the military is not out fighting wars on behalf of the community, its members spend their time drilling and ensuring that their skills and equipment are at their best whenever needed. Some military communities - such as those among barbarian communities - are also responsible for hunting to provide fresh meat for the rest of the community; hunting wild game is often good practice for combat, as stealth and accuracy are as important when stalking wild game as they are in a fight against an armed opponent.

                Designing, building and maintaining the community's defenses are other aspects of the military life. As the community relies on the military for protection in times of conflict, ensuring that the defenses are solid and well maintained is as important as ensuring that the troops have the proper weapons and training. In the case of a small community and basic defenses, the military portion of the population may be called upon to build the defenses themselves. In larger communities, the military community may be able to call upon the civilian community for assistance in construction city walls, stone fortresses, or more complicated defenses.

                Signs of a military community include fortifications, armed patrols, local men and women practicing combat skills, parades and inspections, and large armories full of weapons and armor.

Military Community skills: Craft (armorsmithing, bowmaking, blacksmithing, carpentry, leatherworking, locksmithing, trapmaking, weaponsmithing), Handle Animal, Knowledge (architecture & engineering, dungeoneering, geography, history, local, military tactics, nobility & royalty), Profession (cook, hunter, military commander, siege engineer), and Survival.

Skill Points per Level: 1 + population.

Defense Bonus: +1 per level.

Culture Bonus: +1 per 4 levels.

 

Arcane Community (Aco)Edit

Arcane communities focus on researching and teaching the arts of arcane magic. From a single elven mage in an isolated village to the great arcane academies at Sendrellar that trained generations of mages, arcane communities provide their members the opportunity to focus on their magical abilities while leaving the mundane tasks of everyday life to others.

                Arcane communities are the most academic of all the community types. Instead of spending their time outside indulging in physical activities, their members spend most of their time indoors poring over their scrolls or performing alchemical experiments. They prize learning and knowledge above all else, often maintaining vast libraries of knowledge that allow their members to study ancient scrolls and tomes that will help them understand the magical forces they manipulate.

                The members of an arcane community often provide schooling to the rest of the population, even those who do not possess the gift of magic. Thus, a population with an arcane community tends to be more literate than one without access to books and learning. Parents who understand the value of the ability to read, write, and think logically often seek to send their children to study under the tutelage of the local arcane community. As for the wizards, they typically don't mind these potentially mundane duties as they both allow them to identify the magically adept among the younger generations and to instruct others not to fear the ways of magic. As such, populations with arcane communities typically possess less superstition and unreasonable fear than those without.

                Arcane communities can work closely with military communities to provide a potent magical complement to footmen and siege engines. Outside of a time of war, however, relations between the two communities can sometimes be strained.

                Signs of an arcane community include not only the arcane sanctums and towers that wizards call home, but also libraries, strange chemical smells drifting through the community, and the sometimes disturbing presence of the creatures summoned by magic.

Arcane Community Skills: Appraise, Craft (alchemy, bookbinding, calligraphy, painting, sculpting), Decipher Script, Knowledge (all), Perform (oratory), Profession (apothecary, bookkeeper, herbalist), Speak Language, Spellcraft, and Use Magical Device.

Skill Points per Level: 2 + population.

Defense Bonus: +1 per 4 levels.

Culture Bonus: +1 per 3 levels.

 

Religious Community (Rco)Edit

A religious community tends to the faith and healing of the rest of the community, aiding them with all things spiritual. In wandering tribes, the religious community may be but a single shaman or spiritwalker. In more ordered societies the religious community may be a complicated structure intimately intertwined with the arcane community and involving nearly everyone in the city. Each culture has its own religious practices, and whether in the smallest town or the largest metropolis, those practices are supported by the religious community.

                Each religious community has some sort of designated area where it practices its rituals, usually considered sacred - or profane. This could be as simple as a special cave or grotto, or a constructed temple that required years and the labor of hundreds to construct.

                The members of a religious community may not all share the same outlook. Several shrines to different faiths may exist, in peaceful coexistence or in competition for faithful believers. Missionary groups from outside cultures may also form part of a population's religious community.

                Healing and spiritual guidance are among the most important roles that a religious group plays within the population. Its members typically have knowledge not only in the spiritual healing of people but also the physical healing, gathering collections of exotic herbs and medicines in order to teach people how to use them properly. The religious community is also usually in charge of the proper methods of dealing with the dead, whether it be burying their bodies and putting their spirits to rest, or bringing the dead back to serve the community as undead workers.

Religious Community Skills: Craft (bookbinding, calligraphy, painting, sculpting), Diplomacy, Heal, Knowledge (architechture & engineering, history, local, nature, religion, the planes), Perform (act, percussion instruments, sing, wind instruments), Profession (apothecary, bookkeeper, cook, herbalist, scribe), Spellcraft, and Use Magic Device.

Skill Points per Level: 2 + population.

Defense Bonus: +1 per 3 levels.

Culture Bonus: +1 per 2 levels.

Community FeatsEdit

Like characters, communities gain feats as they increase in level. A community’s types are added together to get the community’s total level to determine whether a community gains a new feat when it gains a new level. Communities gain a feat at 1st level, 3rd level, and every 3 levels thereafter.

 

Ancient Ruins

The community is built on or near some ancient ruins. The lure of these ruins brings adventurers in search of treasure and scholars in search of knowledge. This is different from the ruins resource.

Benefit: The community produces +1 income per year and its Learning increases by +1.

 

Apparition

An entity or power has chosen to give some form of sign to members of the community, creating a holy site for believers.

Prerequisites: Religious community level 1.

Benefit: The sight of the miraculous apparition increases a believer’s faith. Consequently, all divine spells cast within the community’s area by units housed in this community are treated as 1 spell level higher. This stacks with Great Temple.

 

Basic Fortifications

The community is protected by rudimentary fortifications, usually timber-framed guard towers.

Prerequisites: Craft (carpentry) 4 ranks, Knowledge (architecture & engineering) 4 ranks.

Benefit: The community’s Resilience increases by +1.

 

Cavalry Squadrons

The community’s military installations are equipped to train cavalry units.

Prerequisites: Handle Animal 4 ranks.

Benefit: Any building that allows the construction and housing of a military unit allows construction of any unit types it normally supports as well as mounted units.

 

Caves

A set of mostly unexplored caverns exists underneath, or close to, the community.

Benefit: The caves provide a place for the population to hide in times of trouble, granting a +1 bonus to the community’s Resilience score. Additionally, adventurers attracted by unexplored caverns bring the community an influx of coin, increasing its income production by +1.

 

Fertile Fields

The community’s farmlands are especially fertile, resulting in higher crop yields.

Prerequisites: Civilian community level 3.

Benefit: The community produces +1 food per year, and gains a +1 bonus to Resilience.

 

Great Temple

Believers of a particular faith have constructed a huge and ornate place of worship.

Prerequisites: Religious community level 6, Temple or Burial Chamber, Craft (stonemasonry) 4 ranks, Knowledge (architecture & engineering) 4 ranks.

Benefit: The community’s Awareness score increases by +2. Additionally, all divine spells cast within the community’s area by units housed in this community are treated as 1 spell level higher. This stacks with Apparition.

 

Heavy Fortifications

The community has constructed an elaborate stone fortress around its most important quarters, typically two rows of stone walls with battlements atop each one, and underground chambers to evacuate civilians into during times of trouble, offering a strong defense against outside attack.

Prerequisites: Basic Fortifications, Moderate Fortifications, Craft (stonemasonry) 4 ranks, Knowledge (architecture & engineering) 4 ranks.

Benefit: The community’s Resilience score increases by +3.

 

Infamous

The community has gained a bad reputation – rightly or wrongly – that causes some to fear or shun it while others send their wealth in hopes of appeasing it.

Benefit: The community’s Mobility score increases by +2 but it takes 1 more food unit than normal to increase its population.

Special: A community with the Infamous feat cannot also have the Renown feat.

 

Ley Line Nexus

The community sits on or near the convergence of two or more lines of magical energy.

Prerequisites: Arcane community level 3.

Benefit: The background magic level is much higher than the surrounding area. All arcane spells cast within the community’s area of influence are treated as 1 spell level higher.

 

Library

The community has access to a large collection of books, scrolls, and other written material.

Benefit: The community’s Learning score increases by +2. It may also add one Knowledge skill it does not currently possess as a class skill to its class skill list.

 

Moderate Fortifications

The community has erected solid fortifications, typically a stone wall surrounding the entire community with a secure gate and regularly spaced watchtowers.

Prerequisites: Basic Fortifications, Craft (stonemasonry) 4 ranks, Knowledge (architecture & engineering) 4 ranks.

Benefit: The community’s Resilience score increases by +2.

 

Renown

The community has a good reputation.

Benefit: The community’s Command score increases by +2 and imperial envoys that it creates gain a +2 bonus to Diplomacy checks. However, this extra training and maintenance of the reputation is costly. The community produces 1 less income than normal (this cannot cause the community to produce less than 0 income).

Special: A community with the Infamous feat cannot also have the Renown feat.

 

Rich Hunting

The countryside surrounding the community is especially rich in game animals, fish, or produce.

Prerequisites: Civilian community level 1.

Benefit: The community gains a bonus resource of an appropriate type in any applicable square within its area of influence.

 

Safe Harbor

The community is lucky enough to have a place where sailing vessels can tie up safely. The community also has cargo facilities nearby where the vessels can be loaded and unloaded, as well as bars and hotels to put up sailors while they are in port.

Prerequisites: Civilian community level 3, military community level 1, the community must be situated on a river, lake, or coast.

Benefit: The community’s Defense bonus to combat strength increases by +4 for all water-based attacks. Being a safe harbor also draws in ships in need during storms, increasing the community’s income creation by +1.

 

Shipyard

The community has the skills and materials to build sailing vessels.

Prerequisites: The community must be situated on a river, lake, or coast; Craft (shipmaking) 4 ranks.

Benefit: The community’s Mobility score increases by +2, and it can construct, support, and house one naval unit for each land unit it can create.

 

Siege Weaponry

The military has access to trebuchets, catapults, ballistae, and other heavy weapons for fighting large-scale battles.

Prerequisites: Profession (siege engineer) 4 ranks.

Benefit: Military units created by the community can be equipped with siege weaponry. Such a unit’s speed is reduced by -2 (speed cannot be brought to less than 1 by this) and cannot use any attack but ranged attacks. The unit must take a special action called a Set Up action before it can fire. The unit’s ranged combat strength is increased by +8, and every 4 ranks in Profession (siege engineer) that the unit’s home community has increases its ranged strength by another +1. The unit’s range is 8, but its minimum range is 2 (meaning it cannot attack adjacent units). Additionally it gains +50% ranged combat strength when attacking a community, fort, fortified unit, or other structure.

 

Stockpile

The community has enough reserves of food, water, and raw materials to survive for an extended period.

Benefit: If the community is affected by a negative event, the severity of the event is reduced by 10%.

Special: This feat may be taken multiple times, reducing the severity of negative events by an additional 10% each time, up to 100% reduction.

Note: This feat does not affect rebellions or incursions.

 

Tower

The community has erected a high tower – much larger than a typical watchtower – that lets the community keep an eye on the surrounding countryside for a considerable distance.

Prerequisites: Basic Fortifications, Craft (stonemasonry) 4 ranks, Knowledge (architecture & engineering) 4 ranks.

Benefit: The community’s Mobility score increases by +2.

 

Wagon Train

The community has a collection of wagons and beasts of burden for hauling cargo, either locally or as part of a merchant caravan.

Prerequisites: Mobility 13+.

Benefit: The community produces +1 income and happiness.


AssetsEdit

Every empire seeks to develop itself, whether for more military might to crush its neighbors or simply to make life better for its citizens. Empires create a variety of assets, which are used in a number of ways in pursuit of further development.

 

Culture & Community LevelEdit

Level

XP Needed

1

0

2

10

3

30

4

60

5

100

6

150

7

210

8

280

9

360

10

450

11

550

12

660

13

780

14

910

15

1050

16

1200

17

1360

18

1530

19

1710

20

1900

Each community produces a certain amount of culture each year, which is added to that community's total culture in the spring season. Culture determines a community's level and is added into an empire-wide pool used to enact social policies. Culture produced by each community is specific to that community for the purpose of determining the community's level. The leveling chart for communities is seen here. Each spring the amount of culture the community creates is added both to the community's culture pool to determine its level and to the empire's culture pool. So if a community creates 6 culture for one year, it adds that 6 to its own pool and to the empire's pool.

                There are very few ways of creating culture. Every community creates 1 culture every year as long as it has at least one population unit. Communities of certain types gain bonus culture per year depending on the community’s level (see Community Types above). In addition, certain buildings can increase the community's culture creation. Several Wondrous Buildings also create culture. There are no square improvements that can create culture.

                Each time the community gains a level it receives 1 point to spend on increasing its ability scores. Unlike purchasing ability scores when founding the community, this point is added on a 1 to 1 scale to the ability score. In addition, the community gains more skill points, feats, and its defense and culture bonuses may increase as seen in the community types above. A community's level does not display how large it is, or how populated it is (though most high level communities are very large and populous), but rather how rich and influential its culture is. The more culturally adept a community is, the more complex types of professions and buildings it can support.

 

 

Food & PopulationEdit

Each community produces a certain amount of food each year, which is added to that community’s food stores each fall season. During the spring season each community must feed its population and determine if there is enough food to increase the population of the community.

                A community’s population count helps to determine the size categorization (per the DMG pg. 137). Communities with 1 population unit are considered thorps; 2 to 5 units make up a hamlet; 6 to 10 units make up a village; 11 to 15 units make up a small town; 16 to 20 units make a large town; 21 to 25 units make a small city; 26 to 30 units make a large city, and 31 or more units make a metropolis.

                At the beginning of the spring season the first thing you must do for each community is to feed it. Every population unit, civilian unit, and military unit consumes 1 food unit. Every population unit you leave unfed creates two points of unhappiness in the community. Every civilian and military unit you fail to feed disbands and is considered destroyed.

                You may purchase additional food units at a cost of 1 income for 1 food unit, but the food will not be available for two seasons. Therefore it would be wise to determine any shortage in the fall harvest so that the food can be ready by spring.

                Population Growth: Once all of your people are fed, check the remaining food in each community to determine if there is enough to gain a new population unit in that community. A community requires 20 surplus food units per existing population unit (not including civilian and military units) before it can grow an additional population unit. Once it has enough, it automatically grows one population unit that spring, which can immediately be assigned a task. The community’s surplus food units are then reduced by the amount it took to increase the population of the community.

                Assigning Population: A community’s population units may be assigned to a specific square within the community’s area of influence (as dictated by its Mobility modifier). Each square can only be worked by one population unit. These assignments must be given in the spring season in order to gain any benefits from them later in the year.

                Specialists: Alternately a population unit can be assigned as a specialist. Each building the community has constructed can contain one specialist. Specialists produce 1 unhappiness each year, which comes from them needing more to keep them happy than typical population units. Each specialist creates 1 income, research, culture, and production, and an additional +2 of whatever necessity the building’s type is that the specialist is assigned to. Specialists may not be assigned to happiness buildings.

 

 

Happiness & UnhappinessEdit

Every community’s population works and fights harder when happier. Communities produce a certain amount of happiness each year during the fall season. Typically communities are incapable of producing happiness by default. Instead they require happiness buildings and luxury resources. Some social policies can also affect happiness.

                Each unique luxury resource being worked by any community in the empire that is connected via a trade route to the capital produces +1 happiness for all communities with such a trade route (including the capital itself). Multiple luxury resources of the same type do not stack their happiness benefits, but may be traded for income without fear of losing the happiness benefit of the resource. See Income (below) for details on trading. Typical luxury resources include: cotton, dyes, furs, gems, incense, ivory, marble, pearls, silk, spices, sugar, whales, and wine; though rarer resources such as gold and silver are not unheard of and may provide additional benefits.

                Unhappiness: Every spring season after determining food shortages and population growth, each community determines its unhappiness generation. Unhappiness is generally caused by population size, occupying a conquered city, and disasters. Every 3 population units create 1 unhappiness, while every individual military unit creates 1 unhappiness. People have entertainment needs, and soldiers even more so. Any unit unable to eat due to food shortages creates +2 extra unhappiness.

                A single point of happiness can mitigate a single point of unhappiness. An unhappy community creates 10% less food, culture, production, research, and income that year. Unhappiness carries over to the next year, meaning once a community becomes unhappy it gets harder and harder to make them happy once again.

                If a community’s unhappiness exceeds its population units, the community is in revolt and does not create any food, income, culture, research, or production. Any resources worked by that community are no longer considered connected to the empire and its trade routes are temporarily broken (though no actual breaking of the routes occurs). All military units housed in that community become a rebel army that actively begins fighting against the empire. All such units must be defeated and the community must be conquered before it can be brought back into the empire, and is treated as an occupied community going forward.

                Excess Happiness: In addition to avoiding revolts, a happy community will work harder for the empire. Every odd point of happiness the community has after mitigating unhappiness each spring means that it will create an extra +0.5 production and income that year. Every even point of excess happiness means the community will create an extra +0.5 research and food that year. Finally, every 3 points of excess happiness gives all military units housed in that community +1 combat strength that year.

 

 

IncomeEdit

Money makes the world go ‘round, or at least that is the old saying and it holds true in your empire. Income is another resource created by the empire’s communities. Like research, income created by the community is added to the empire’s income pool rather than a specific community. Each spring after food and happiness are allocated, the empire must pay upkeep on the major buildings, roads, and military units throughout its reach to keep them in good repair or in fighting shape.

                A community’s income helps to determine its GP limit (per the DMG pg. 137). For every unit of income the community generates beyond the needs of its upkeep, its GP limit is increased from what is listed in the DMG by 25% for the community’s size (see Food & Population above for information on determining community size).

                Income is created in the fall harvest by each community with income buildings and those working squares that create income. Additionally a functioning trade route between a community and the capital increases the income production of both that community and the capital by +1.

                Upkeep: Any unit, building, or improvement that the empire does not pay upkeep for becomes inactive that year. If the empire does not pay the upkeep cost of something two consecutive years it permanently shuts down or disbands, and must be built again.

                Trading: To generate additional income the empire can trade created units of food, luxury and strategic resources, or military and civilian units to other empires by sending an Imperial Envoy to another empire. The envoy packs up all offered units as soon as it leaves, making them unavailable to the empire. Once an envoy reaches the border of one of the target empire’s area of influence it can negotiate a trade agreement. This is done via a Diplomacy check (using the Diplomacy modifier of the community the envoy is housed in) opposed by the target empire’s community’s Appraise check.

                If you win the check, you get full price for your offerings. For every 5 points you beat the target empire’s check by, you gain 10% more income from the trade (rounded down). If you lose the check, the empire still buys your offerings, but managed to haggle a better price. You get only 50% of the normal price of the offering (round down). Any income you gain becomes available once the envoy reaches the border of one of your communities.

                Food units sell for 1 income each; strategic and luxury resources sell for 3 income each; military and civilian units sell for 1 income per level. If the target empire is in dire need of some of the offered resources your envoy may receive a bonus to its Diplomacy check, netting you more income from the trade.

                You may also send an envoy to purchase some or all of the same items from other empires. This is treated in the exact same way. The targeted empire may or may not have the requested items available for sale though. A single envoy may both buy and sell items during a single journey. Any purchased items become available once the envoy returns.

                Additionally, envoys may buy and sell completed research projects. Selling one of your completed research projects has a base price equal to 50% of the research cost of that project, while buying one has a base cost of 100% of the research project’s cost.

                Using Excess Income: Any income left over after paying upkeep costs can be used to purchase a hurried production for a project a community is working on, to purchase items in a trade (above), or to create research agreements with other empires.

                To purchase hurried production of a particular project costs 2.5 income per point of production still needed to finish the project (rounded up). The project is then automatically completed the following spring with no additional production cost. Any number of projects can be hurried each year.

 

 

ProductionEdit

Production represents both the labor and material costs required to construct buildings, train units, and otherwise bring civilization to wilderness. Like all resources, production is harvested each fall. Each community’s production is unique to itself, like happiness, and can only be assigned to projects in that community. Like culture and research, every community creates 1 production as long as it has at least 1 population unit.

                Construction and training projects must be assigned an amount of production from the community’s production pool each spring, however this does not need to be the full cost of the project. Most communities spend years constructing large buildings or training a group of soldiers to be combat ready. Production that is assigned to a specific project is consumed immediately, and production can only be assigned during the spring. Once a project has been assigned sufficient production to complete it, the project’s results become available for use the following spring.

                Using Excess Production: If a community has no projects to work on, or the empire has need of other resources, the community can be directed to turn its production efforts to produce either goods or research instead of assigning production to projects in the spring.

                If the community is directed to produce goods, 25% of the production it would normally create that fall is instead created as income. All remaining production is lost and cannot be added to the community’s pool.

                If the community is directed to produce research, 25% of the production it would normally create that fall is instead created as research. All remaining production is lost and cannot be added to the community’s pool.

 

 

ResearchEdit

As has been so often proven, the empire with the most advanced technologies tends to outlive its peers. Research is vitally important to every empire. Any building with a community level requirement higher than 1st level has to be researched before it can be built. Many buildings, improvements, and units can be improved with research projects. Research can also be applied to increase a particular community’s ability scores. Like culture and production, every community creates 1 research as long as it has at least 1 population unit.

                Research is added to the empire’s research pool each fall; communities don’t have individual research pools. Research is assigned to projects like production is. Research can only be assigned to a research project during the spring. The empire can only have one research project ongoing at any given time. It can take an empire many years to complete a research project. Once a research project has been assigned enough research to complete it, it becomes available the following spring. Once research is applied to a particular project, it is consumed immediately.

                If the empire decides to change its current research project before it is completed, all spent research is wasted. The new project begins from scratch, and if the empire decides later to research what it was originally working on again, it must begin from nothing. It is therefore very important to be sure what research project you want your empire to work on.

                Research Projects: Most research projects benefit the empire as a whole. For example, once the empire has researched the ability to build the Aqueduct building, all communities in the empire can start a production project to build one. Once the Steam Power research project has been completed, all lumber mills in the empire begin creating an extra production unit.

                Completed research projects can be sold to other empires by sending an envoy (see Income above). The base price is typically 50% of the research cost (rounded up).

                Research Agreement: An envoy must be sent to create a research agreement, which can be done at the same time as other envoy tasks if desired. A research agreement begins to take effect immediately and costs each empire 1 income per combined unique research projects already completed (minimum 1 income). The agreement will take 2d4 years to bear fruit, after which time it provides a one-time bonus to each empire’s research pool the following spring equal to the number of years it lasted multiplied by half the income invested by the empire.

                Improving Ability Scores: The empire may dedicate its research efforts to figuring out ways to efficiently improve a single ability score of a single community. The research cost of such a project is always equal to 2 X the community’s level + the current ability score. Once completed, this causes the affected community’s targeted ability score to increase by +1. So to improve the Mobility of a level 3 community from a 14 to a 15 would cost the empire 20 research.

 

 

ResourcesEdit

There are innumerable resources throughout the world, however they are rarely in concentrations high enough to be of use to an empire, even a small one. When they are, they can provide the empire with significant benefits. There are four classifications of resources: luxury, strategic, bonus, and ruins.

Luxury ResourcesEdit

These resources increase the happiness of the community working them and all other communities connected to this one by a trade route. Each luxury resource type provides the bonus happiness only once. Luxury resources can be bought from and sold to other empires for income. This is typically done for a predetermined amount of years, each year the selling empire loses access to the resource and the buying empire pays a certain amount of income for it. Luxury resources include things like cotton, dyes, furs, gems, gold, incense, ivory, marble, pearls, silk, silver, spices, sugar, whales, and wine. Each luxury resource being harvested creates one of that resource type for the empire.

Strategic ResourcesEdit

These resources increase the production output of the square they are found on by +1. In addition, many military units require strategic resources to produce. Strategic resources can be bought from and sold to other empires for income. This is typically done for a predetermined amount of years, each year the selling empire loses access to the resource and the buying empire pays a certain amount of income for it. Strategic resources include things like horses, iron, coal, and stone; though rarer resources such as mithril and living rock are not unheard of and may provide additional benefits. Each harvested strategic resource created 1d4 of that resource, determined when workers are first assigned to harvest it. Whenever a unit is created that requires a specific resource, that resource is no longer available to the empire for any purpose until that unit is killed or disbanded. The bonus to production in that square remains even if all of the resources it produces are being used or sold.

Bonus ResourcesEdit

These resources, unlike the other two types, cannot be bought or sold. Their benefit is in creating additional food for the community harvesting them, though some buildings may allow these resources to provide the community with further benefits. Bonus resources typically include things like bananas, cattle, deer, fish, sheep, and wheat. Each harvested bonus resource allows that square to produce +1 food when worked.

Ruins ResourcesEdit

Ruins resources are unique in that they are temporary. A square with a ruins resource loses the ruins once a military or civilian unit enters that square and the ruins become explored. The empire that explores the ruins must roll a d%.

                                01 – 15: Resource Map. The empire learns the location of a nearby strategic resource. Roll 1d8 to determine the adjoining square that contains the resource (1 indicating the square due north of the ruins) then 1d4 to determine the resource type: 1=horses, 2=iron, 3=stone, 4=coal.

                                16 – 30: Ancient technology. Your current research project gains enough research to be completed next spring. If you have no current research projects, the lowest cost research project (not including community ability score improvements) becomes your active research project and will be completed next spring.

                                31 – 45: Survivors. The ruins contain survivors of the Culling that are happy to assimilate into your empire. The nearest community to the ruins gains +1 population unit.

                                46 – 60: Ancient Armory. The ruins contain powerful arms and armor, and forgotten fighting techniques. The unit that explored the ruins gains one of the following benefits: +2 combat strength, +2 speed, or can change to be any available class (if a military unit).

                                61 – 75: Settlers. A band of lost settlers is found holed up in the ruins. Grateful for their rescue, they join your empire as a Settler civilian unit.

                                76 – 90: Workers. A band of lost workers is found holed up in the ruins. Grateful for their rescue, they join your empire as a Work Crew civilian unit.

                                91-100: Treasure Trove. Your unit found a cache of hidden treasure. You gain a one-time bonus 1d4 X 5 income to your empire’s income pool, available immediately.

 

Terrain TypesEdit

Most empires have a wide array of terrain types within their borders. While certainly each empire’s terrain is unique, for the purposes of running the empire they can be condensed into a few basic terrain types. Every square can be defined as one of the below terrain types. It is possible for a square to change its terrain type. The Clearcutting improvement can change a forest, jungle, or swamp into plains, hill, tundra, or whatever the underlying terrain would be. Some Events (see below) can alter terrain types as well. Droughts can turn previously arable plains into desert wastelands, or a sudden earthquake can make mountains spring up from the surrounding forest.

                Terrain determines how quickly units can move through territory, and may impose a penalty to unit speed. This penalty is always assessed when the unit enters the square, but can never reduce the unit’s speed to less than 0.

                Terrain also determines the basic value that square can provide a community that assigns a population unit to work it. Unless the square contains a resource, all squares of the same type will create the same amount of income, production, and other community necessities.

                It is possible for a square to possess more than one terrain type. If so, all community necessities, movement requirements, and combat modifiers stack. For example, a forested hill would create 1 food, 3 production, would cost 3 speed points to enter, and would provide a +50% combat strength bonus to a unit occupying that square.

 

Terrain Type

Food: Describes the food this terrain type creates.

Income: Describes the income this terrain type creates.

Production: Describes the production this terrain type creates.

Movement: This is the number of speed points entering this square requires. Squares with more than one type that have elevated movement requirements, use the highest as the base, then subtract 1 from the movement requirement of all other types and add the results, if positive, to the base. So a coastal (1) forested (2) mountain (3) square would have a total movement requirement of 4 (base of 3, plus (2 minus 1) and (1 minus 1)).

Combat Modifier: This gives a percentage change in the combat strength of any unit on this square. Units only gain this modifier if they begin their turn on this square and it lasts for as long as the unit remains on that square. Round down for fractional results. The minimum benefit or penalty this modifier can create is 0.

 

Terrain Type

'Food' Ŧ

Income

Production

Movement

Combat Modifier

Coast

1

1

0

1

+0%

Forest

1

0

1

2

+25%

Hill

0

0

2

2

+25%

Jungle

2

1

0

2

+25%

Lake/Oasis

2

1

0

1

+0%

Mountain

0

0

3

3

+50%/+10%**

Ocean

1

1

0

1

+0%

Plains

1

0

1

1

-20%

Swamp

1

0

0

2

+25%

Tundra

1

0

0

1

-20%

Wasteland*

0

0

0

1

-20%


  • Wasteland typically applies to desert, snow, ice, and other normally unusable areas of land.  


    • Ranged units gain +50% combat strength on mountain squares. All other unit types gain +10%.

'Ŧ 'Rivers: Any square that contains a river running through it produces +1 food.

 

SeasonsEdit

In this system we measure time in seasons, also called turns. There are some activities that a ruler must perform during certain seasons, as seen below. If a particular action isn’t listed below, it can be performed in any season.

                Spring: Spring is the most administratively intense seasons, as there are many required actions during the spring.

1.       Feed Your People: The first action during every year is to feed all of your population, military, and civilian units. Population and civilian units consume 1 food unit each, while military units consume a number of units listed in their Upkeep section.

2.       Determine Population Growth: After feeding your people, determine if any communities have grown an additional population unit. See Food & Population for more details on this.

3.       Pay Upkeep: Pay any upkeep costs on buildings, units, and improvements.

4.       Determine Unhappiness: Determine the amount of happiness and unhappiness generated for each community, as seen in Happiness & Unhappiness above. Determine if you have a revolt on your hands.

5.       Assign Production and Research to Projects: Assign available production for each community to any production projects it has going on within its area of influence. Assign accumulated research to the empire’s research project.

                Summer: The only required action during the summer season is the Summer Random Event roll.

                Fall: The only required action during the fall is the fall harvest, during which you tabulate all of the resources and assets your empire has cultivated since the spring.

                Winter: The only required action during the winter season is the Winter Random Event roll.

Common Community BuildingsEdit

Each community can be improved by constructing specialized buildings within or near it. A community can only be assigned one construction project at a time. Buildings are divided into categories and the community's ability scores dictate the maximum number of each building type. The categories are culture, defense, food, happiness, income, production, and research. Buildings often have prerequisites that a community must meet before it can construct that building. Typical prerequisites are skill ranks, community level, and other buildings. Unless otherwise stated benefits from different buildings stack. Constructing the same building more than once has no additional effect. Buildings that provide more than one type of bonus only count as the type of building they are listed as.

                Many buildings must be researched before they can be built (see Research above). However once a building has been researched it becomes available for construction in any community that meets that building's prerequisites from then on.

                Buildings take as many years to complete as needed until the community assigns sufficient production to complete the building. See Production below for more information.

 

Building Name

Prerequisites: Displays any requirements that the community must meet before it can begin a construction project for this building.

Research: The amount of research the empire must spend to figure out how best to integrate this building into its unique societal structure.

Production: The amount of production the community must spend to complete the building. A building becomes completed after a number of seasons equal to the minimum required community level once enough production has been spent on it.

Upkeep Cost: The amount of income this building will require to be spent on its maintenance, employee pay, and other expenses. Upkeep is assessed each spring.

Benefit: The bonuses and abilities the building will grant to the community once completed. Unless otherwise stated any benefits to culture, income, or other community-created resources occur every year and are cumulative with all other bonuses of that type.

Upgrades: Describes any research project the empire can undertake to improve this building. Once an upgrade has been researched all existing buildings are automatically altered accordingly, and all communities that construct that building in the future build the improved version.

 


Culture BuildingsEdit

These buildings increase the community's cultural influence and are the key to making the city become more influential, and thus higher level. Each year a community gains a number of experience points equal to the culture it produces. See Culture & Community Level above for details on increasing a community’s level.

                A community's Awareness modifier dictates the maximum number of culture buildings it can have. The amount of culture the community created for the previous year is calculated at the end of each winter.

 

Monument

Prerequisites: Community level 1.

Research: None.

Production: 4.

Upkeep Cost: 1.

Benefit: +2 culture per year.

Upgrades: None.

 

Burial Tomb

Prerequisites: Community level 2, cannot have a Temple, Knowledge (religion) 2 ranks.

Research: 10.

Production: 10.

Upkeep Cost: None.

Benefit: +2 culture per year, +2 happiness per year.

Upgrades: None.

 

Temple

Prerequisites: Community level 2, cannot have a Burial Tomb, Knowledge (religion) 2 ranks.

Research: 10.

Production: 10.

Upkeep Cost: 2.

Benefit: +3 culture per year.

Upgrades: Grand Temple (10, reduces the upkeep cost by -2 and increases the culture created by +1).

 

Monastery

Prerequisites: Community level 3, improved Wine or Incense resource within range.

Research: 25.

Production: 12.

Upkeep Cost: None.

Benefit: Each square with an improved Wine or Incense resource creates +2 culture in addition to its other benefits.

Upgrades: None.

 

Opera House

Prerequisites: Community level 4, must have either Temple or Burial Tomb, Perform (any) 4 ranks.

Research: 65.

Production: 20.

Upkeep Cost: 2.

Benefit: +4 culture per year.

Upgrades: None.

 

Museum

Prerequisites: Community level 5, Knowledge (history) 5 ranks, Opera House.

Research: 130.

Production: 30.

Upkeep Cost: 3.

Benefit: +5 culture per year.

Upgrades: None.

 


Defense BuildingsEdit

These buildings perform a number of tasks related to the community's ability to defend itself and produce military units for the empire's army. Unless a community builds some of the buildings here that specifically allow it to do so, the community will not be capable of creating or fielding any military units.

                The community’s defense score is added to the combat strength of all units fighting within its area of influence. When multiple communities’ areas of influence overlap, only use the higher defense score. Additionally, a community may attack nearby hostile units, even without a military garrison present. The community may make ranged or melee attacks, and can attack up to 3 squares away. The community’s combat strength equals its defense score. Communities also ignore the first point of damage from any given attack, and an additional point of damage for every 5 points of defense score the community has.

                A community's Resilience modifier dictates the maximum number of defense buildings it can have. Increased defense bonuses and extra military unit slots become available as soon as the building is complete.

 

Barracks

Prerequisites: Community level 1, Knowledge (military tactics) 1 rank.

Research: None.

Production: 7.

Upkeep Cost: 0.

Benefit: Allows the creation, housing, and maintenance of one land unit.

Upgrades: None.

 

Walls

Prerequisites: Community level 1, Craft (stonemason) 1 rank.

Research: None.

Production: 7.

Upkeep Cost: None.

Benefit: Increases the community's defense bonus by +2.

Upgrades: Advanced Masonry (5, improves the defense bonus of Walls by +1 and decreases the production cost by -1).

 

Armory

Prerequisites: Community level 2, Barracks, Craft (weaponsmithing or armorsmithing) 2 ranks.

Research: 15.

Production: 16.

Upkeep Cost: 0.

Benefit: Allows the creation, housing, and maintenance of one land unit.

Upgrades: None.

 

Castle

Prerequisites: Community level 3, Walls, Craft (stonemason) 3 ranks, Knowledge (architecture & engineering) 3 ranks.

Research: 44.

Production: 16.

Upkeep Cost: None.

Benefit: Increases the community's defense bonus by +2.

Upgrades: Citadel (44, increases the castle's defense bonus by +1, causes the community to create +2 culture, and reduces the production cost by -1).

 

Military Academy

Prerequisites: Community level 4, Barracks, Knowledge (military tactics) 4 ranks, Profession (military commander) 4 ranks.

Research: 130.

Production: 30.

Upkeep Cost: 1.

Benefit: Allows the creation, housing, and maintenance of one land unit.

Upgrades: Advanced Training (130, military units supported by this community begin with +1 combat strength, +1 speed, or +2 hit points, you may choose when the unit is created).

 

Arsenal

Prerequisites: Community level 4, Craft (siege weapons) 4 ranks, Profession (siege engineer) 4 ranks, Castle.

Research: 142.

Production: 30.

Upkeep Cost: None.

Benefit: Increases the community's defense bonus by +3. Also allows the creation, housing, and maintenance of one siege unit.

Upgrades: None.

 

Military Base

Prerequisites: Community level 5, Knowledge (military tactics) 5 ranks, Profession (military commander) 5 ranks, Military Academy.

Research: 220.

Production: 50.

Upkeep Cost: None.

Benefit: Increases the community's defense bonus by +6.

Upgrades: The Best Defense (220, enemy units suffer damage for each square within this community’s area of influence that they enter equal to ¼ of its defense bonus. In combat this has no effect.).

 


Food BuildingsEdit

Food buildings help the community's food production, which helps its population grow. The larger the community's population, the more it can create and harvest for the empire. Each year the community's food is added to its previous food stores to determine any population growth. After adding in the previous year's food production, every population unit consumes one food unit. Each population unit that does not consume a food unit generates two unhappiness.

                A community requires 20 food per current population units in order to gain a new population unit, at which point those food units are consumed (unlike experience for characters gaining levels). Most water and arable land squares will provide some food when worked, especially when improved, but there are bonus resources that also provide extra food when worked. Typically these resources are fruits, cattle, deer, fish, sheep, and wheat. Any square with one of these resources automatically produce +1 food when worked, in addition to any other benefits gained by appropriate improvements.

                A community's Resilience modifier determines the maximum number of food buildings it can support. A community's food harvest for the previous year is determined during the fall. Food is allocated to existing population units and population increases are determined each spring.

 

Granary

Prerequisites: Community level 1, Profession (farmer or hunter) 1 rank.

Research: None.

Production: 6.

Upkeep Cost: 0.

Benefit: +2 food per year. Additionally improved livestock (cattle & sheep) and produce (fruits & wheat) squares produce +1 food per year when those squares are being worked.

Upgrades: None.

 

Water Mill

Prerequisites: Community level 1, Profession (miller) 1 rank, community must be on a square that contains a river.

Research: None.

Production: 7.

Upkeep Cost: 2.

Benefit: +2 food per year and +1 production.

Upgrades: None.

 

Lighthouse

Prerequisites: Community level 2, Profession (fisherman or sailor) 1 rank, Knowledge (architecture & engineering) 1 rank, community must be on a coast square.

Research: 8.

Production: 7.

Upkeep Cost: 1.

Benefit: +1 food per year from all worked ocean squares.

Upgrades: Signaling (16, this community’s Mobility is considered +2 higher when determining its area of influence over ocean squares).

 

Aqueduct

Prerequisites: Community level 3, Knowledge (architecture & engineering) 3 ranks.

Research: 25.

Production: 10.

Upkeep Cost: 1.

Benefit: Reduces the number of food units per current population unit count required to gain a new population unit by -8.

Upgrades: None.

 

Hospital

Prerequisites: Community level 5, Profession (apothecary) 5 ranks, Profession (herbalist) 5 ranks, Heal 5 ranks, Aqueduct.

Research: 168.

Production: 36.

Upkeep Cost: 2.

Benefit: +5 food per year.

Upgrades: Emergency Care (168, any unit stationed on this community’s square for 4 consecutive seasons becomes fully healed. Any units within this community’s area of influence are healed 1 hp each spring.).

 

Medical Lab

Prerequisites: Community level 6, Profession (apothecary) 6 ranks, Profession (herbalist) 6 ranks, Craft (alchemy) 6 ranks, Hospital.

Research: 260.

Production: 50.

Upkeep Cost: 3.

Benefit: Reduces the number of food units per current population unit count required to gain a new population unit by -5.

Upgrades: Medical Kits (260, all military units this community supports heal 1 hp per season while in friendly territory, or 1 hp each spring otherwise).

 


Happiness BuildingsEdit

Happiness buildings increase the community's happiness. This helps fight against unhappiness and can improve the efficiency of the community's population and military units. As a community's population grows it requires more and more entertainment to keep it happy. For every 3 population units and every single military unit the community supports it generates 1 unhappiness. Also, any population units unable to eat that year create two extra unhappiness.

                See Happiness below for details on the effects of happiness. Each unique improved luxury resource being worked by the community grants +1 happiness. Multiple luxury resources of the same type can be traded, but provide no additional happiness. Typical luxury resources include: cotton, dyes, furs, gems, incense, ivory, marble, pearls, silk, spices, sugar, whales, and wine; though rarer resources such as gold and silver are not unheard of and may provide additional benefits.

                A community's Command modifier determines the maximum number of happiness buildings it can support. A community's happiness and unhappiness generation for the previous year is calculated at the fall harvest. Excess happiness or unhappiness is calculated the following spring, and any bonuses or penalties are assessed then.

 

Circus

Prerequisites: Community level 2, improved horse or ivory resource being worked by the community.

Research: 10.

Production: 8.

Upkeep Cost: None.

Benefit: +2 happiness.

Upgrades: None.

 

Coliseum

Prerequisites: Community level 2, Knowledge (architecture & engineering) 2 ranks.

Research: 10.

Production: 10.

Upkeep Cost: 1.

Benefit: +2 happiness.

Upgrades: Stadium (260 - requires a community level 6 in the empire, increases happiness output by +3).

 

Courthouse

Prerequisites: Community level 2, Profession (bookkeeper) 2 ranks, Knowledge (local) 2 ranks.

Research: 10.

Production: 10.

Upkeep Cost: 4.

Benefit: When built in a conquered community this eliminates the unhappiness generated from being conquered.

Upgrades: None.

 

Theatre

Prerequisites: Community level 3, Perform (any) 3 ranks, Coliseum.

Research: 65.

Production: 20.

Upkeep Cost: 1.

Benefit: +3 happiness.

Upgrades: None.

 


Income BuildingsEdit

These buildings help to provide income to the community. Income, like research, is added to the empire's pool each year rather than the individual community like culture, happiness, food, and production are. Income is used to pay upkeep on buildings and some improvements, as well as military units. It can also be used to purchase additional production for a community struggling to construct a particular building or create a certain unit. Income can also be used to purchase food, luxuries, and even research from other empires (see Income above). The empire needs a strong economy if it is going to support a large military or thriving communities. Some squares, particularly ocean, lake, and coast squares, will produce income if worked. Also the Trading Post square improvement can create income, especially if in a square with a river.

                A community's Mobility modifier determines the maximum number of income buildings it can support. The amount of income the community generated over the previous year is calculated at the fall harvest. Upkeep costs are assessed the following spring.

 

Market

Prerequisites: Community level 3, Appraise 3 ranks.

Research: Currency (25).

Production: 12.

Upkeep Cost: None.

Benefit: +2 income per year. Also increases the community's total income created by 25%.

Upgrades: Bazaar (25, luxury resources being worked by this community produce an extra resource of that type).

 

Mint

Prerequisites: Community level 3, improved square with gold or silver resources being actively worked.

Research: Currency (25).

Production: 12.

Upkeep Cost: None.

Benefit: Each improved square with a gold or silver resource being worked increases the community's income by +2.

Upgrades: None.

 

Bank

Prerequisites: Community level 4, Profession (bookkeeper) 4 ranks, Market.

Research: Banking (65).

Production: 20.

Upkeep Cost: None.

Benefit: Increases the community's total income created by 25%.

Upgrades: None.

 


Production BuildingsEdit

These buildings create more production value in the community, which allows the community to construct buildings, improvements, goods, various civilian and military units, including settler units. Typically nearby forest, hill, and mountain squares will provide some production, especially once improved. Strategic resources also increase the production of the squares they are on once improved. Improved squares with strategic resources automatically produce +1 production when worked. Typical strategic resources include horses, iron, coal, and stone; though more rare resources such as mithril and living rock are not unheard of and may provide additional benefits.

                A community's Force modifier determines the maximum number of production buildings it can support. The community's production created over the previous year is calculated at the fall harvest and is assigned in the spring. Production left unassigned is lost.

 

Stable

Prerequisites: Community level 2, Handle Animal 2 ranks, Profession (rancher) 2 ranks, at least one improved square with sheep, cattle, or horses being actively worked.

Research: 10.

Production: 10.

Upkeep Cost: 1.

Benefit: Working any improved squares with sheep, cattle, or horses produce +1 production for the community. Additionally creating any mounted military units cost this community 4 less production.

Upgrades: Military Stables (20, allows the community to create, house, and maintain one mounted military unit).

 

Forge

Prerequisites: Community level 3, Profession (miner) 3 ranks, Craft (blacksmith) 3 ranks, at least one improved square with iron being actively worked.

Research: 25.

Production: 12.

Upkeep Cost: 1.

Benefit: Any improved squares with iron produce +1 production when worked. Also creating any land military units costs this community 3 less production.

Upgrades: Great Forge (50, if any mithril, nephelium, or adamantine resources are being worked by this community, created military units gain +1 combat strength, +1 speed, or +5 hit points, respectively).

 

Harbor

Prerequisites: Community level 3, Profession (sailor) 3 ranks, community must be built adjacent to a lake or on a coast square.

Research: 34.

Production: 12.

Upkeep Cost: 3.

Benefit: Any naval military units produced by this community cost 5 less production than normal. Also creates a trade route to your capital if it also has a harbor.

Upgrades: Drydock (34, naval units adjacent to this community heal 1 hp per season).

 

Workshop

Prerequisites: Community level 3, Craft (any) 3 ranks.

Research: 25.

Production: 12.

Upkeep Cost: 2.

Benefit: The community produces +2 production. Also reduces the production cost of any buildings constructed in this community by -2.

Upgrades: None.

 

Seaport

Prerequisites: Community level 4, Profession (fisherman or sailor) 4 ranks, one improved sea resource (fish, whales, or pearls) being actively worked.

Research: 90.

Production: 25.

Upkeep Cost: 2.

Benefit: Each improved ocean resource (fish, whales, pearls) being worked by the community creates +1 production in addition to its normal benefits.

Upgrades: None.

 

Windmill

Prerequisites: Community level 4, Knowledge (geography) 4 ranks, Knowledge (architecture & engineering) 4 ranks.

Research: 90.

Production: 25.

Upkeep Cost: 2.

Benefit: The community creates +2 production.

Upgrades: None.

 

Factory

Prerequisites: Community level 5, Knowledge (architecture & engineering) 5 ranks, Craft (any) 5 ranks, 1 unit of coal, Workshop.

Research: 168.

Production: 36.

Upkeep Cost: 3.

Benefit: The community creates +4 production. Also increases the community's total production created by 10%. The required unit of coal is consumed when the factory is built and remains consumed until the factory is shut down (such as by not paying the upkeep).

Upgrades: None.

 


Research BuildingsEdit

These buildings help to improve the research the community adds to the empire. Research is used to unlock any buildings above 1st level requirement. It can also be used to upgrade some buildings, making them better than before. Research is also the only way to improve a community's ability scores other than increasing its level, so it is very important for many reasons. Research is not created normally by any means except by research buildings, some social policies, and some wondrous buildings. When research is spent to unlock or upgrade something, it is consumed much the way that food is consumed when a community's population increases. The empire can only be assigned one research project at a time. A research project is completed the spring after it is assigned sufficient research.

                A community's Learning modifier determines the number of research buildings it can support. A community's research created during the year is calculated and added to the empire's pool of research during the fall harvest.

 

Library

Prerequisites: Community level 1, Profession (bookkeeper) 1 rank.

Research: None.

Production: 7.

Upkeep Cost: 1.

Benefit: The community produces +1 research for every 2 population units.

Upgrades: Paper Maker (10, the Library produces an extra +1 research per 4 population units, and also creates +1 production).

 

University

Prerequisites: Community level 3, Knowledge (any two) 3 ranks, Profession (bookkeeper) 3 ranks, Library.

Research: 44.

Production: 16.

Upkeep Cost: 2.

Benefit: Increases the community's total research created by 30%. Also any jungle squares being worked by the community produce +2 research in addition to the square's normal benefits.

Upgrades: Religious School (44, does not require a Library, does not provide bonus research from jungle squares, produces +3 culture).

 

Observatory

Prerequisites: Community level 4, Knowledge (nature) 4 ranks, Knowledge (architecture & engineering) 4 ranks, community must be adjacent to a mountain square.

Research: 65.

Production: 20.

Upkeep Cost: None.

Benefit: Increases the community's total research created by 50%.

Upgrades: None.

 

Public School

Prerequisites: Community level 5, Knowledge (any three) 5 ranks, Profession (bookkeeper) 5 ranks, University.

Research: 130.

Production: 30.

Upkeep Cost: 3.

Benefit: The community produces +3 research, and an additional +1 per 2 population units.

Upgrades: None.

 

Research Lab

Prerequisites: Community level 6, Knowledge (any one) 6 ranks, Craft (alchemy) 6 ranks, Public School.

Research: 260.

Production: 50.

Upkeep Cost: 3.

Benefit: The community produces +4 research. Additionally this increases the community's total research created by 50%.

Upgrades: None.

 

 


ImprovementsEdit

Communities can have designated work crews enhance nearby squares with certain construction projects called improvements. Improvements, like buildings, must be researched before becoming available if they are higher than a level 1 requirement. Each square can only have 1 improvement (roads do not count toward this limit). Improvements can only be built by work crews, specially trained civilian population units. Each work crew is independent and cannot work in tandem with another. Each work crew may only be assigned one improvement project at a time. An improvement is considered complete the spring after its work crew has been assigned sufficient production to finish it.

                No improvement has an upkeep cost except for roads. Each square with a road system in it requires 1 income for upkeep.

 

Clearcutting

Prerequisites: Community level 1, Profession (lumberjack) 1 rank.

Square Type: Forest, jungle, or swamp.

Production: 5.

Benefit: The square changes from its current type to plains, hill, wasteland, tundra, or whatever other type it may now be without its vegetation. This creates a one-time bonus of +10 production to the nearest community.

Upgrades: None.

 

Hunting Camp

Prerequisites: Community level 1, Profession (hunter) 1 rank.

Square Type: Any square with deer, fur, or ivory resources.

Production: 6.

Benefit: Connects the resource located on the square to the empire, granting additional food in the case of deer or happiness in the case of fur and ivory.

Upgrades: None.

 

Farm

Prerequisites: Community level 1, Profession (farmer) 1 rank.

Square Type: Plains, hill, coast, or tundra.

Production: 7.

Benefit: Increases the food output of the square by +1.

Upgrades: Civil Service (40, farms adjacent to lakes or on squares with rivers produce +1 food), Fertilizer (130, farms without access to fresh water produce +1 food).

 

Fishing Boats

Prerequisites: Community level 1, Profession (fisherman) 1 rank.

Square Type: Any square with whales, fish, or pearls.

Production: 4.

Benefit: Connects the resource located on the square to the empire, granting additional food in the case of fish or happiness in the case of whales and pearls.

Upgrades: None.

 

Mine

Prerequisites: Community level 1, Profession (miner) 1 rank.

Square Type: Any with coal or a metal resource, or a hill or mountain.

Production: 8.

Benefit: Increases the production created by the square by +1 and connects the resource (if any) to the empire, increasing the production created by the tile by an additional +1.

Upgrades: None.

 

Pasture

Prerequisites: Community level 1, Profession (rancher) 1 rank.

Square Type: Any with horses, cattle, or sheep resources. Must clearcut if forest, jungle, or swamp.

Production: 6.

Benefit: Connects the resource located on the square to the empire, granting additional food in the case of cattle and sheep, or production in the case of horses.

Upgrades: None.

 

Plantation

Prerequisites: Community level 1, Profession (herbalist) 1 rank.

Square Type: Any with fruits, dyes, silk, spices, sugar, cotton, wine, or incense resources. Must clearcut if forest, jungle, or swamp.

Production: 7.

Benefit: Connects the resource located on the square to the empire, granting additional food in the case of fruits, or happiness in the case of the other listed resources.

Upgrades: None.

 

Quarry

Prerequisites: Community level 1, Craft (stonemason) 1 rank.

Square Type: Any with marble or stone resources. Must clearcut if forest, jungle, or swamp.

Production: 8.

Benefit: Connects the resource located on the square to the empire, granting additional production in the case of stone, or happiness in the case of marble.

Upgrades: None.

 

Roads

Prerequisites: Community level 1.

Square Type: Any land.

Production: 3.

Benefit: Any square with a system of roads built on it counts as only 1 square for the purposes of movement of units regardless of terrain type. The first square with roads on it that a unit enters counts as 0 squares of movement, effectively increasing the speed of the unit by +1 that season. Additionally when connecting a community to your capital community, roads create a trade route.

Upgrades: Machinery (44, the second square with roads that a unit enters also counts as 0 squares of movement, effectively increasing the unit’s speed by an additional +1 that season), Watchtowers (25, hostile units gain no benefits from using roads controlled by your communities).

 

Trading Post

Prerequisites: Community level 1, Profession (any) 1 rank.

Square Type: Any land except wasteland and mountain.

Production: 7.

Benefit: The square produces +2 income in addition to any other benefit it provides when being actively worked.

Upgrades: None.

 

Fort

Prerequisites: Community level 2, Knowledge (military tactics) 2 ranks, Knowledge (architecture & engineering) 2 ranks.

Research: 25.

Square Type: Any land.

Production: 8.

Benefit: Increases the community's defense bonus for any unit occupying this square by 50%.

Upgrades: None.

 

Lumber Mill

Prerequisites: Community level 2, Profession (lumberjack) 2 ranks, Craft (carpentry) 2 ranks.

Research: 25.

Square Type: Forest only.

Production: 7.

Benefit: Increases the production created by the square by +1.

Upgrades: Steam Power (168, the square creates an additional +1 production).

 

Learning Center

Prerequisites: Legendary sage.

Research: None.

Square Type: Plains, hill, coast, or tundra. Must clearcut if forest, jungle, or swamp.

Production: N/A (this can only be constructed by a legendary sage).

Benefit: The square creates +6 research in addition to its normal benefits.

Upgrades: None.

 

Inspirational Monument

Prerequisites: Legendary bard.

Research: None.

Square Type: Plains, hill, coast, or tundra. Must clearcut if forest, jungle, or swamp.

Production: N/A (this can only be constructed by a legendary bard).

Benefit: The square creates +6 culture in addition to its normal benefits.

Upgrade: None.

 

Marvelous Workshop

Prerequisites: Legendary engineer.

Research: None.

Square Type: Plains, hill, coast, or tundra. Must clearcut if forest, jungle, or swamp.

Production: N/A (this can only be constructed by a legendary engineer).

Benefit: The square creates +6 production in addition to its normal benefits.

Upgrade: None.

 

 


Wondrous BuildingsEdit

In addition to common community buildings, a community can construct a wondrous building. These buildings do not count toward the building limit of any of the common building types, however every community may only contain a single wondrous building. Each wondrous building must be researched before it can be constructed, and they take a significant amount of resources to research and produce. However the benefits they provide are often equal to or greater than the costs they entail. No wondrous building ever requires an upkeep cost, and likewise none ever has any upgrade capability, even if the wondrous building also acts like a common building such as with the Tower of Veloria. An empire may not contain more than one of the same type of wondrous building. Each wondrous building has a minimum community level requirement before it can be built in that community, and your empire must have at least one community of that level before they can be researched.

                If a community has at least one improved square with a marble resource being worked, that community gains 2 free production each year to spend on a wondrous building project.

 

Imperial Palace

Prerequisites: Community level 1.

Research: None.

Production: 50.

Benefit: This community becomes the empire’s capital. Normally the first community founded under your influence is the empire’s capital. Increases the culture of the community by +1.

 

Tower of Veloria

Prerequisites: Community level 2, community must be adjacent to a sea coast.

Research: 25.

Production: 43.

Benefit: All of the empire's naval units gain +1 speed. Also functions as a lighthouse for the community it is built in. Increases the culture of the community by +1.

 

Ritual Circle

Prerequisites: Community level 2.

Research: 25.

Production: 40.

Benefit: Increases the culture of the community by +8.

 

Grand Library

Prerequisites: Community level 2.

Research: 25.

Production: 61.

Benefit: Your empire is considered to have completed research projects for all community level 2 common buildings. Also functions as a library for the community it is built in. Increases the culture of the community by +1.

 

Royal Burial Tombs

Prerequisites: Community level 2.

Research: 25.

Production: 28.

Benefit: Two work crew units appear in squares adjacent to the community this is built in, and the production cost of all improvements is reduced by -1. Increases the culture of the community by +1.

 

Veloria's Bounty Monument

Prerequisites: Community level 2, community must be adjacent to a lake or on a coast square.

Research: 25.

Production: 50.

Benefit: The income created by water squares worked by this community increases by +1 per square. Also increases the culture of the community by +1.

 

Seer's Retreat

Prerequisites: Community level 3.

Research: 50.

Production: 50.

Benefit: Immediately gain any social policy you currently qualify for. This does not cost any culture, but does increase the culture cost of future policies. Also increases the culture of the community by +1.

 

Imperial Gardens

Prerequisites: Community level 3.

Research: 50.

Production: 66.

Benefit: All currently founded communities in the empire gain +1 population unit. Increases the happiness of this community by +3 and its culture by +1.

 

Legendary Defenses

Prerequisites: Community level 3.

Research: 50.

Production: 115.

Benefit: Enemy land units must spend 1 extra speed per square to move within the community's area of influence (based on its Mobility modifier, see above). Also increases the culture of the community by +1.

 

Trade Guilds

Prerequisites: Community level 4, community must have a trade route to the empire's capital.

Research: 140.

Production: 181.

Benefit: Increases the combined income created by trade routes to the empire's capital by 20%. Also increases the community's culture by +1.

 

Cathedral of the Dancing One

Prerequisites: Community level 4.

Research: 140.

Production: 165.

Benefit: Increases the happiness of the community by +5 and the culture of the community by +1.

 

Archmage Tower

Prerequisites: Community level 4.

Research: 140.

Production: 132.

Benefit: A legendary sage civilian unit appears adjacent to the community and is immediately ready for use. See the Legendary Sage civilian unit below and the Learning Center improvement above for details on what this unit can do.

 

Warlord's Castle

Prerequisites: Community level 4.

Research: 140.

Production: 198.

Benefit: Increases the combat strength of units fighting within the area of influence of any of your realm’s communities (as dictated by the community's Mobility modifier, see above) by +3. Increases this community's culture by +3. Also functions as a castle for this community.

 

Sanctified Ground

Prerequisites: Community level 5.

Research: 475.

Production: 215.

Benefit: All communities in the empire create +1 culture. Increases the culture of this community by an additional +1.

 

Torian Historical Society Chapter House

Prerequisites: Community level 5.

Research: 475.

Production: 102.

Benefit: Increases the culture created by this community by +5, and the amount of culture this community adds to the empire's social policy pool by 50%.

 

Bardic College

Prerequisites: Community level 5.

Research: 475.

Production: 231.

Benefit: Two legendary bard civilian units appear adjacent to the community and are immediately ready for use. See the Legendary Bard civilian unit below and the Inspirational Monument improvement above for details on what this unit can do. This wondrous building also increases the culture of the community by +1.

 

Grand Gatehouse

Prerequisites: Community level 5.

Research: 475.

Production: 182.

Benefit: Allows for the creation, housing, and maintenance of two military units. Also increases the culture of the community by +1.

 

Grand Bastion

Prerequisites: Community level 5.

Research: 475.

Production: 165.

Benefit: Increases the defense bonus of all common buildings that grant defense bonuses by +1 in all communities throughout the empire. Also increase the culture of this community by +3.

 

Grand Colossus of the Emperor

Prerequisites: Community level 6.

Research: 730.

Production: 396.

Benefit: Every population unit in every community causes that community to create +1 production. Increase the culture of this community by +1.

 

Meyne the Redeemer

Prerequisites: Community level 6.

Research: 730.

Production: 396.

Benefit: The culture cost of adopting new social policies is reduced by 33%. This may cause the empire to be eligible for a new social policy immediately. Also increases the culture of the community by +1.

 

Tower of Lilyth

Prerequisites: Community level 6.

Research: 730.

Production: 330.

Benefit: Increases the happiness of the community by +8 and the culture of the community by +1.

 

Forum of the Gods

Prerequisites: Community level 7.

Research: 1110.

Production: 330.

Benefit: Immediately gain any social policy you currently qualify for. This does not cost any culture, but does increase the culture cost of future policies. Increases the culture of this community by 50%. Also increases the culture of the community by +1.

 

 


Social PoliciesEdit

As the empire's culture grows in strength and complexity it becomes possible for the leader to enact sweeping political changes throughout the entirety of the empire. These are called social policies. Though culture is accumulated into the social policy pool each spring (see Culture & Community Level above), any time enough culture is accumulated to gain a new policy you may select a new policy.

                The empire's first policy costs 10 culture. Each policy thereafter takes double the culture than the previous one did. Additionally, every community in the empire beyond the first increases the culture cost of future social policies by 50% of the base cost, which is calculated AFTER determining the cost based strictly on the number of policies currently purchased. Round up for both of these increase types.

                Therefore if a beginning empire with one community achieves its first policy, the second policy will cost 20 culture (10 X 200%) and the third will cost 40 culture (20 X 200%). The fourth would normally cost 80 culture (40 X 200%), but the empire founded a second community since purchasing the third policy, so that one will cost 100 culture instead (40 X 250%)

                Some social policies require the empire to be able to support higher level communities than others, as indicated in their prerequisites field below. There are 9 policy branches to choose from, but once begun a branch doesn’t necessarily have to be completed before another can be chosen. Many branches are incompatible with others, as noted below. If the empire wishes to adopt a branch that isn't compatible with a previously select branch, it may choose to denounce the previously purchased branch, losing all benefits it granted and must re-purchase the branch if the empire wishes to return to its old policies. Denouncing a policy branch does not reduce the cost of purchasing future branches, so choose the policies you wish to adopt carefully.

 

Tradition BranchEdit

Adopting Tradition increases the culture in your capital by +3. Once all policies in this branch are adopted each community produces +2 food.

Prerequisites: Community level 1.

Incompatibilities: Liberty, Order, Freedom.

·         Aristocracy: Each community creates 1 unhappiness per 5 population units instead of per 3 population units. Also reduces the production cost of constructing wondrous buildings by 15%.

o    Prerequisites: Tradition Branch.

·         Oligarchy: A military unit that occupies the square that contains the community it belongs to for 4 consecutive seasons costs no upkeep, and causes the defense bonus of that community to double. As soon as the unit moves away from the community's square these benefits are lost.

o    Prerequisites: Tradition Branch.

·         Legalism: The first four communities in the empire gain a free Monument building upon the community being founded. This grants no additional effect to those communities if they have already built monuments.

o    Prerequisites: Tradition Branch.

·         Landed Elite: The capital produces +2 food.

o    Prerequisites: Aristocracy, Oligarchy.

·         Monarchy: The capital produces +1 income per 2 population units, and never produces unhappiness from the number of population units it has.

o    Prerequisites: Oligarchy.

Liberty BranchEdit

Adopting Liberty increases the culture created by each community by +1. Once all policies in this branch are adopted a legendary sage, legendary bard, or legendary engineer (see Civilian Units below), your choice, appears adjacent to the capital.

Prerequisites: Community level 1.

Incompatibilities: Tradition, Autocracy, Order.

·         Collective Rule: Reduces the production cost of settler units by -4 when created in the capital and a free settler unit appears adjacent to the capital.

o    Prerequisites: Liberty Branch.

·         Citizenship: Reduces the production cost of all improvements by -1 and a free work crew unit appears adjacent to the capital.

o    Prerequisites: Liberty Branch.

·         Republic: Every community creates +1 production and reduces the production cost of common and wondrous buildings by -1.

o    Prerequisites: Collective Rule.

·         Representation: Each community you found going forward will increase the culture cost of new social policies by 25% instead of 50%.

o    Prerequisites: Citizenship.

·         Meritocracy: Each trade route creates +1 happiness in the community the route connects to the capital.

o    Prerequisites: Citizenship.

Honor BranchEdit

Adopting Honor grants a +4 bonus to combat strength against invaders, and any invading units killed in friendly territory produce +1 culture to the social policy pool. Once all policies in this branch are adopted each enemy unit killed creates a one-time, immediate amount of income for the empire equal to half of that unit's combat strength (rounded down).

Prerequisites: Community level 1.

Incompatibilities: None.

·         Warrior Code: The production cost of creating melee military units is decreased by -2.

o    Prerequisites: Honor Branch.

·         Discipline: Military units gain a +2 bonus to combat strength when adjacent to another friendly unit. This bonus does not stack if a unit is adjacent to multiple friendly units.

o    Prerequisites: Honor Branch.

·         Military Tradition: Military units gain 50% more experience points from combat.

o    Prerequisites: Warrior Code.

·         Military Caste: Each community with a military unit belonging to it that occupies the same square the community is on for 4 consecutive seasons creates +1 happiness and +2 culture. These benefits are lost if the unit moves away from this square.

o    Prerequisites: Discipline.

·         Professional Army: Each common building that provides a defense bonus (walls, castle, arsenal, military base) create +1 happiness for the community.

o    Prerequisites: Military Caste.

Piety BranchEdit

Adopting Piety decreases the amount of production required to construct common culture buildings by -3. Once all policies in this branch are adopted all future social policies cost 10% less culture.

Prerequisites: Community level 2.

Incompatibilities: Rationalism.

·         Organized Religion: Monuments, Temples, and Monasteries create +1 happiness in addition to their normal benefits.

o    Prerequisites: Piety Branch.

·         Mandate of Heaven: 50% of the excess happiness (happiness in excess of the unhappiness in each community) in the empire is added to its social policy culture pool each spring.

o    Prerequisites: Piety Branch.

·         Theocracy: Temples no longer require an upkeep cost.

o    Prerequisites: Organized Religion.

·         Reformation: Every community that has built or builds a wondrous building creates an extra 25% culture (round down).

o    Prerequisites: Organized Religion.

·         Free Religion: Monuments, Temples, and Monasteries create +1 culture.

o    Prerequisites: Reformation, Mandate of Heaven.

Commerce BranchEdit

Adopting Commerce will increase the income generated by your capital by +4. Once all policies in this branch are adopted every population unit in the empire creates +1 income.

Prerequisites: Community level 3.

Incompatibilities: None.

·         Naval Tradition: Naval military units gain +1 speed.

o    Prerequisites: Commerce Branch.

·         Trade Unions: The total upkeep cost of the empire's road system is reduced by 25% (rounded down). Also the Harbor and Seaport buildings create +1 income in addition to their normal benefits.

o    Prerequisites: Commerce Branch.

·         Merchant Navy: Every community adjacent to a sea coast or ocean square creates +3 production.

o    Prerequisites: Naval Tradition.

·         Mercantilism: The income cost of speeding production is reduced by 25%.

o    Prerequisites: Trade Unions.

·         Protectionalism: Each luxury resource connected to the empire, even duplicate resources, create +1 happiness in the communities they are connected to.

o    Prerequisites: Mercantilism.

Freedom BranchEdit

Adopting Freedom means that each spring the empire has a 1% chance per excess happiness generated to produce a random legendary person (see Civilian Units below, roll 1d6: 1-2 legendary sage, 3-4 legendary bard, 5-6 legendary engineer). This percentage chance cannot be higher than the level of your highest level community. Once all policies in this branch are adopted benefits granted by any legendary person's improvements double.

Prerequisites: Community level 4.

Incompatibilities: Tradition, Order, Autocracy.

·         Constitution: Each wondrous building creates +2 culture in addition to its normal benefits.

o    Prerequisites: Freedom Branch.

·         Universal Suffrage: The defense bonus of each community is increased by 25%.

o    Prerequisites: Freedom Branch.

·         Civil Society: Each population unit only consumes half a unit of food each spring instead of a whole unit.

o    Prerequisites: Freedom Branch.

·         Free Speech: The 8 military units with the most expensive upkeep cost no longer require any upkeep. These units are identified when the policy is adopted and may not be changed unless one or more of these units are killed or disbanded.

o    Prerequisites: Constitution.

·         Democracy: Each community produces 1 less unhappiness.

o    Prerequisites: Civil Society.

Rationalism BranchEdit

Adopting Rationalism increases the total research created by the empire by 10%. Once all policies in this branch are adopted each common research building produces +1 income in addition to their normal benefits.

Prerequisites: Community level 4.

Incompatibilities: Piety.

·         Secularism: Each community creates +2 research.

o    Prerequisites: Rationalism Branch.

·         Humanism: Universities, Observatories, and Public Schools produce +1 happiness in addition to their normal benefits.

o    Prerequisites: Rationalism Branch.

·         Free Thought: Trading post improvements create +1 research in addition to their normal benefits. Also each University building creates +1 research.

o    Prerequisites: Secularism.

·         Sovereignty: So long as the empire has at least 1 excess happiness, the total research created by the empire is increased by 10% that year.

o    Prerequisites: Humanism.

·         Scientific Revolution: Choose two research projects you are currently eligible to undertake. You instantly research both for free.

o    Prerequisites: Free Thought.

Order BranchEdit

Adopting Order causes every community to create +1 happiness. Once all policies in this branch are adopted each community creates +1 food, production, research, income, and culture.

Prerequisites: Community level 5.

Incompatibilities: Liberty, Tradition, Freedom, Autocracy.

·         United Front: The production cost of military units is reduced by -1 when the empire is at war.

o    Prerequisites: Order Branch.

·         Nationalism: Your military units gain +4 combat strength when fighting in friendly territory.

o    Prerequisites: Order Branch.

·         Planned Economy: Any community with a Factory creates 25% more research.

o    Prerequisites: Order Branch.

·         Socialism: The total income required to pay building upkeep costs is reduced by 10% for each community (rounded down). This may not reduce upkeep by more than the level of your highest level community x 10%.

o    Prerequisites: Planned Economy.

·         Communism: Each community creates +2 production, and the production cost of creating common buildings is reduced by -2.

o    Prerequisites: Socialism.

Autocracy BranchEdit

Adopting Autocracy reduces the total income upkeep cost of military units by 25%. Once all policies in this branch are adopted all military units gain a +20% combat strength bonus for the next 30 years.

Prerequisites: Community level 5.

Incompatibilities: Liberty, Freedom, Order.

·         Militarism: The income cost for hurrying the production of military units is reduced by 25%.

o    Prerequisites: Autocracy Branch.

·         Populism: Military units not at full health gain a +4 combat strength bonus.

o    Prerequisites: Autocracy Branch.

·         Police State: The Courthouse building creates +3 happiness in addition to its normal benefits.

o    Prerequisites: Militarism.

·         Fascism: Each strategic resource being worked produces two of that resource instead of one.

o    Prerequisites: Militarism, Populism.

·         Total War: The production cost of creating military units is reduced by -1, and all communities may create, house, and maintain one additional military unit.

o    Prerequisites: Police State, Fascism.

 

Random Events

Negative Events

01%

Rebellion

02%-03%

Incursion

04%-06%

Infestation

07%-09%

Dead End

10%-12%

Theft

13%-15%

Natural Disaster

16%-18%

Strike

19%-21%

Stagnation

No Event

22%-79%

No Event

Positive Events

80%-82%

Cultural Heritage Festival

83%-85%

New Technique Discovered

86%-88%

Positive Omen

89%-91%

Windfall

92%-94%

Sudden Insight

95%-97%

Good Weather

98%-99%

Settlers

100%

Volunteer Militia

EventsEdit

No matter how successful of a ruler you are, there will be times when fate throws you a curveball. These can be beneficial events, such as perfect weather resulting in a better food harvest, or negative ones like natural disasters or a rebellion.

                Each winter and summer season you must roll a d% to see if a random event occurs. If so, then roll on the appropriate severity table to determine how widespread the effect of the event is.

 

Negative Events

Negative Event Severity

01%

All communities affected

02%-25%

2d6 communities affected

26%-50%

2d4 communities affected

51%-74%

1d6 communities affected

75%-99%

1d4 communities affected

100%

One community affected

                Rebellion: Affected communities with the highest excess unhappiness (or lowest excess happiness if no communities are unhappy) rebel, seceding from your empire and becoming hostile. All attached units rebel with the communities.

                Incursion: Affected communities with the lowest Awareness scores are each targeted by 1d3 enemy units of an appropriate race and class for the area.

 

                Infestation:

Positive Event Severity

01%

One community affected

02%-25%

1d4 communities affected

26%-50%

1d6 communities affected

51%-74%

2d4 communities affected

75%-99%

2d6 communities affected

100%

All communities affected


Affected communities with the highest food creation lose 50% of all food created in

those communities that year. This does not affect stored food.

                Dead End: Affected communities with the highest research output create no research that year.

                Theft: Affected communities with the highest income creation contribute no income to the empire that year.

                Natural Disaster: Affected communities with the highest excess happiness create 50% less happiness that year.

                Strike: Affected communities with the highest production output create no production that year.

                Stagnation: Affected communities with the highest culture output create no culture that year.

 

Positive Events

                Cultural Heritage Festival: Affected communities with the lowest culture output create 50% more culture that year.

                New Technique Discovered: Affected communities with the lowest production output create 50% more production that year.

                Positive Omen: Affected communities with the highest excess unhappiness (or the lowest excess happiness if no communities are unhappy) create 50% more happiness that year.

                Windfall: Affected communities with the lowest income output create 50% more income that year.

                Sudden Insight: Affected communities with the lowest research output create 50% more research that year.

                Good Weather: Affected communities with the lowest food output create 50% more food that year.

                Settlers: Affected communities with the lowest number of population units each gain 1 population unit in addition to any they may gain from excess food.

                Volunteer Militia: Affected communities with the lowest Force scores receive a unit of level 1 warriors. These units cost no production to build, no upkeep to maintain, and need no special housing. They cannot leave the community’s area of influence though. A community may not have more militia units than its level.

 


UnitsEdit

An empire’s population makes up the majority of its inhabitants. However, on occasion the empire may have need of more specialized groups of people. These are expressed as units, both civilian and military. A unit is a group of similarly skilled individuals and is treated as a single entity. Each community can only support so many units, as detailed below.

 

Civilian UnitsEdit

There are six civilian units, but only three types that a community can create. Creating a civilian unit reduces the community's current population by 1 and stops all food creation while the unit is being created. Work crew units build improvements around the community, imperial envoy units allow you to make deals with other empires, while settler unit can found new communities. All three types can be created by any level 1 community with at least 2 population units.

                A community's Force modifier limits the number of work crews it can create, while its Command modifier limits the number of imperial envoy and settler units the community can create. These limitations are over the course of the community’s lifetime and do not refresh at any point.

 

Work CrewEdit

Production: 7.

Upkeep Cost: 0.

HP: 1.

Combat Strength: 1.

Speed: 2.

Task: Build improvements. Each work crew can only construct one improvement at a time, and only one work crew may be constructing on a given square. Each work crew creates 1 production every fall that is automatically assigned to whatever project it is working on. If a work crew has no projects, it creates no production.

 

Imperial EnvoyEdit

Production: 8

Upkeep Cost: 0.

HP: 2.

Combat Strength: 1.

Speed: 2.

Task: Initiate diplomatic talks with another empire. An envoy can buy and sell food or resources, draft research agreements, buy or sell completed research projects, and perform other diplomatic actions. See Diplomacy below. Additionally, when not performing any actions during the previous spring and summer, an envoy creates 1 income for the empire during the fall.

 

SettlerEdit

Production: 9.

Upkeep Cost: 1 income.

HP: 1.

Combat Strength: 0.

Speed: 2.

Task: Found new community. A settler takes 4 seasons to found a community.

 

Legendary SageEdit

Production: N/A (this unit can’t be created normally).

Upkeep Cost: None.

HP: 1.

Combat Strength: 0.

Speed: 2.

Task: Choose either to immediately finish the empire’s current research project, or build a Learning Center.

 

Legendary BardEdit

Production: N/A (this unit can’t be created normally).

Upkeep Cost: None.

HP: 1.

Combat Strength: 0.

Speed: 2.

Task: Choose either increase a community's culture and happiness by 50% for one year or to construct an Inspirational Monument.

 

Legendary EngineerEdit

Production: N/A (this unit can’t be created normally).

Upkeep Cost: None.

HP: 1.

Combat Strength: 0.

Speed: 2.

Task: Choose either to immediately finish one production project or to construct a Marvelous Workshop.

 

DiplomacyEdit

Sometimes a soothing word is more powerful than a swinging sword. Every realm will, at some point or another, want to enter into some kind of diplomatic talks with another realm. Most of this will be done via imperial envoys, an indispensable part of any empire. These versatile units are businessmen, negotiators, and politicians all in one.

                To enter into any sort of diplomatic negotiation with another realm you must first send an envoy to one of their communities. The community need not be the realm’s capital, though. Once an envoy has made contact with the local authorities it is a trivial matter to get in contact with the real power of the land. In all but the most barbaric realms, imperial envoys are allowed to enter other realms’ controlled territory without a declaration of war or needing an open borders treaty. In most cases they enjoy diplomatic immunity from attack as well and will be left alone, or at worst imprisoned.

                For all diplomatic missions, an envoy must reach a community that belongs to the target empire. Once there, he may begin his return trip the season after he arrived and is considered to have completed all of his business.

                While on a diplomatic mission to another realm an envoy may perform any number of diplomatic actions, though any goods you wish the envoy to negotiate a sale of need to be sent with him when the envoy departs from your lands. Below is a list of the various tasks an envoy can perform in your name.

                Buy/Sell Food: An envoy may attempt to sell excess food from your empire, or buy additional food units from your neighbor. Any food units you wish to sell need to be subtracted from the surplus of the various communities you are taking these food units from before he leaves your territory. This food is removed immediately from your stockpiles as soon as you make the decision on how much you wish to take. Likewise, any food units the envoy purchases for you are not available for dispersal until he returns to one of your communities, at which point you can distribute the purchased food to any communities connected to the community the envoy returned to by a trade route as you see fit. To make a sale or a purchase requires an opposed roll. The envoy makes a Diplomacy roll using his home community’s Diplomacy ranks plus its Command modifier. This roll is opposed by a Diplomacy roll made by the community the envoy is in, but adding its ruler’s Charisma or Intelligence modifier, whichever is higher. The base price for one food unit is one income unit. If your envoy wins this check, you buy or sell at the base price. For every 5 points your envoy beats the other realm’s check by, you either get 10% more for your sold food, or pay 10% less for purchased food (rounded normally… down if under 0.5, up if 0.5 or higher). If your envoy loses this check, you still buy or sell the desired number of units, but you get 50% less for your sold units or pay 50% more for purchased units.

                Buy/Sell Units: This action functions exactly like the Buy/Sell Food action, except that the goods being traded are whole units. These can be military or civilian units, but not population units. The base price for a military unit is its combat strength while the base price for a civilian unit is 2 income. Legendary units cannot be bought or sold.

                Buy/Sell Research: This action functions exactly like the Buy/Sell Food action, except that selling a completed research project does not cause you to lose access to it. The base cost of a research project is 50% (rounded down) of its research cost.

                Trade Agreement: Negotiating a trade agreement allows you to either loan out one or more strategic or luxury resources, or be loaned the same. Trade agreements almost always have a limited duration. When choosing to sell a resource, that resource immediately becomes unavailable and must be decided before the envoy leaves your land, just like with selling food units. Once the envoy reaches a community in the target empire, a similar opposed Diplomacy roll is made with similar effects. The base price for resources is one unit for 3 income. The base duration is 10 years. During the spring following the last year of the agreement, payment stops and the resource’s original owner regains control of it immediately while the purchasing empire loses control of it. This may mean that some military units become inactive or disband. Payment for a trade agreement occurs each spring as part of the upkeep action.

                Research Agreement: A research agreement is a joint effort between two realms to improve the research of both. The participating empires total the number of research projects they have completed individually, then add 2 to the sum. The result is the base amount of income units each empire must pay immediately. The agreement will take 2d4 years to bear fruit, at which time it expires and provides both empires a one-time bonus to their research pools equal to the number of years the agreement last multiplied by half of the income the empire invested into the agreement. (So Empire A had completed 4 research projects and Empire B had completed 1. The agreement is determined to last 7 years. Assuming simply a base cost and benefit, Empire A pays 6 income and Empire B pays 3 into the agreement. Six years later, Empire A gains (7 years X (6/2) = 21) research units and Empire B gains (7 years X (3/2) = 10, rounded down) research units.) Once your envoy reaches a community in the target empire, make a standard opposed Diplomacy roll as described above.  Every 5 points your envoy beats the opposing roll by increases your gain by 10%, while losing the roll reduces your gain by 50%.

                Open Borders Treaty: The envoy attempts to negotiate a treaty in which your empire is allowed to move civilian and military units through a target empire’s controlled lands and vice versa. This is a simple Diplomacy roll, not an opposed roll. The DC depends on the target empire’s policies, alignment, and any other diplomatic actions you are engaged with them in. The base DC is 12. For every social policy that you have that is prohibited to the target empire due to their policies, you receive a -2 penalty. For every step away from your alignment the ruler of that empire’s alignment is, you suffer a -2 penalty. For each alignment axis that you share the same alignment on, you gain a +2 bonus. A trade agreement and/or research agreement that has been ongoing for at least a year grants a +2 bonus to the Diplomacy check. Offering material incentives (such as units, food, resources, etc) provides a bonus equal to the base income value of the offering. Succeeding at this check will grant you access to move through their lands, and grant them access to move through your lands. If you beat the DC by at least 10 you may decide whether or not to open your borders to the target empire, even though they open theirs for you. If you fail, the treaty negotiations failed and no treaty is formed. A failed treaty may not be attempted again for a number of years equal to the amount you failed the check by.

                Alliance Treaty: An alliance is the closest two empires can be without merging. Attempting to negotiate an alliance is very similar to negotiating an open borders treaty, except the base DC is 30 and differences of alignment and social policy cause you to suffer -4 penalties instead of -2 penalties. Having an active open borders treaty grants a +5 bonus. When allied with another empire, you may freely trade food, income, and units without need of an envoy on a 1-for-1 basis based on value. You may claim up to 8 population units from them to work for you for a year, and you may assign them anywhere you like within your realm’s areas of influence. You do not need to feed or house these units, but your ally will request 2 income per borrowed unit for taxes on their travel and work. Additionally your ally is guaranteed to come to your aid in times of war.

                Peace Treaty: Your envoy may attempt to negotiate a peace treaty. This is done via a simple Diplomacy check against a base DC of 40. For every year the hostilities have been going on you gain a +1 bonus. For every community you have conquered you gain a +5 bonus. For every community you’ve lost to them you suffer a -5 penalty. For every two military units you have active more than they do you gain a +1 bonus. Any material incentive you offer grants you a bonus equal to its total base income value. If the peace treaty is successful, both empires agree to no hostilities and closed borders toward each other for a minimum of 10 years. Breaking an ongoing peace treaty is often seen as a despicable, dishonorable, and untrustworthy act and may harm relations you have with other nearby empires even if they dislike the empire you broke the treaty against.

                Declaration of War: There are many ways of declaring war on another empire: attacking a unit or community, moving military units into their land without consent, and attacking their allies are all very effective ways of beginning a war. However, they are typically seen as underhanded and even unprovoked methods of doing so. An alternative is to give the target empire the courtesy of informing them of your pending hostilities. There is no roll the envoy needs to make once he reaches a community in the target empire, and may begin his return journey the following season. Declaring war on another empire is much less likely to damage your relations with other empires unaffiliated with you or your enemy.

 

Military UnitsEdit

There are a number of military units that can be created by communities that have the capability to support them. Some units require special resources to create, as noted in their entries below. Any community with the space for them can create any of these typical unit types unless otherwise stated. A unit is completed the season after the community assigns enough production to complete it.

                While most of the time units of a given type will be similar enough to not warrant a change in any of the stats below, some races can alter a unit’s combat efficiency or give it special bonuses. See the Military Unit Racial Changes subsection below.

                Each military unit has three primary combat statistics: HP, Combat Strength, and Speed. HP is the number of hit points the unit has, combat strength is the aggregated offensive and defensive power of the unit, and speed is how quickly the unit can move across the battlefield.

 

Unit Name

Production: The amount of production the unit requires to be created. See the Military Unit Production Costs chart below for more information on contributing factors to a unit’s production cost.

Upkeep Cost: The amount of income, food, and other resources the unit needs each year to remain active. Most units will require 1 income and 1 food, in addition to any strategic resources the unit requires, as upkeep. Some units may have higher upkeep costs, though, such as mounted units requiring 1 additional food.

HP: The hit points of the unit. Once this reaches 0 the unit has been destroyed. To determine a unit’s hit points, calculate the following: every hit die the unit has counts for one or more HP (A d4 or d6 equals a 1-to-1 ratio, d8 and d10 equals 1-to-2 ratio, and d12s equal a 1-to-3 ratio. All of these are hit die to HP ratios, so a unit with two d12 hit die would gain 6 HP), and every point of Constitution modifier grants a bonus HP (this is a one-time bonus, not a per-HD bonus). For mounted units, add the mount’s HD and Constitution modifier to its rider’s to determine total HP. Unit size also affects hit points (see Unit Size below).

Combat Strength: This is a measure of the unit’s abilities in battle, and constitutes many different variables. Melee and ranged combat strength should be kept separate. The common variables are listed here, and these should be used as an example to help convert any others you may encounter.

Level: Every class level grants a +1 bonus to combat strength. NPC class levels add +0.5 per level. Monstrous units and the mounts of mounted units count their HD as NPC class levels.

Mundane Equipment: Every 100gp of nonmagical equipment the unit possesses grants a +1 bonus to combat strength, except for masterwork weapons and armor. Masterwork weapons and armor use the items’ base cost and add +1 combat strength per masterwork component. Equipment that has no bearing on combat does not add to the unit’s combat modifier. Separate melee and ranged weapons into separate melee and ranged combat strength scores. Each special ability the weapon has (such as reach, improved trip, etc) adds +1 to the unit’s combat strength, otherwise the weapon statistics are typically balanced in such a way that better weapons overall will cost more.

Magical Equipment: Double the total effective enchantment bonus of the weapons, armor, and shields the unit is equipped with is added to its combat strength. This is in addition to the mundane cost of the equipment’s combat strength bonus, but does not take into account masterwork components (which are ignored by magical equipment). For all other magical items, every 1000gp worth of equipment increases the unit’s combat strength by +1. Equipment that has no bearing on combat does not add to the unit’s combat modifier. Note that scrolls and potions are handled separately (see Spells, below).

Spells: Each level of spell the unit has access to grants it a one-time bonus to combat strength equal to 2 x the spell level if used in melee range, or 1 x the spell level if used at range (spells are considered to have a 4-square range). The unit can instead opt to have an area effect spell, targeting a block of 4 squares adjacent to itself. Doing so halves the normal combat strength bonus the spell grants, rounded down. Damaging scrolls and non-healing potions follow these rules as well. Healing spells and potions restore a number of HP equal to the spell level of the potion. Spells, scrolls, and potions that grant a beneficial magical effect pertinent to the combat situation grant a bonus to combat strength equal to the spell’s level for a number of turns equal to half the spell’s level (rounded down, minimum 1 turn).

Ability Scores: For melee units, every point of Strength modifier grants a bonus to combat strength. For ranged units, every point of Dexterity does the same. A unit that has both capabilities adds these to their melee and ranged combat strengths separately. For spellcasting units their key spellcasting ability modifier adds into their combat strength. For mounted units, add the mount’s relevant ability modifier to the members’.

Member Size: Every size category above Medium increases the unit’s combat strength by +4, while every size category lower than Medium reduces the unit’s combat strength by -4. Mounted units use the size of the mount instead.

Unit Size: The actual size of the unit itself, not the members of the unit, also applies the same bonus or penalty as that of the member size. So a small sized unit of minotaur would have a -4 from unit size and a +4 from member size. In addition, units larger than Medium gain 50% additional hit points (rounded down), and units smaller than Medium have half the hit points (rounded down, minimum hp of 1). All created units begin at Medium unit size. Two Medium units that are combined create one Large unit, while two Large units would make one Huge unit, etc. Along the same lines, one Medium unit can be split into two Small units, each of which could be split into two Tiny units, etc.

Range: The maximum range the unit can make an attack at. If the unit has no ranged capabilities this is listed as “melee”. To determine the range of ranged weapon attacks, multiply the weapon’s range by the number of range increments it has, then divide by 250 (i.e. a longbow has a range of 100 and up to 10 range increments, which is 1000 when multiplied; divided by 250 that equals a 5 square range for longbows).

Speed: The number of movement points the unit can spend per turn. To determine a unit’s speed, take the speed of the members, subtract 10 ft., and divide by 10. Round fractional results down to the nearest whole number. Each unit size category of the unit above Medium reduces the unit’s speed by 1 (minimum speed of 1), and each unit size category below Medium increases the unit’s speed by 1 (a unit’s speed cannot be greater than half of its members’ base speed). A unit can spend its speed each turn (a turn is a season).

Special: Any special abilities the unit might have.

 

Military Unit Production Costs

Contributing Factor

High Value

Low Value

Class

PC Class – 4 prd.

NPC Class – 2 prd.

Ability Array

Elite – 4 prd.

Standard – 2 prd.

Equipment

+1 prd / +100gp of equipment.

1 prd for up to 100gp of equipment.

Mount

+2 prd per HD of mount.

No mount – +0 prd.

Spells

Primary - +3 prd; Secondary - +1 prd.

No spellcasting – +0 prd.

When you begin to build a military unit, use the Military Unit Production Costs table to help determine the production cost of the unit. You can mix and match items from the high and low value columns (e.g. you could build a unit of PC classed, standard ability array having, 300gp equipped, non-mounted, non-spellcasting soldiers).

 

Military Unit Class ChangesEdit

Each character class grants special abilities to units that have levels in that class, as seen below.

 

                Adventurer: At the start of the battle, choose any other unit you control with levels in a PC class. This unit gains that unit’s unique class bonus until the end of the battle.

                Astromancer: When the unit is created, assign it a dominance (solar, lunar, stellar). Solar astral mages gain the ability to regain 1 HP at the beginning of their turn each round. Lunar astral mages may use a spell attack to reduce all affected enemy units’ combat strength by the damage instead of dealing damage. Stellar astral mages deal 2 extra damage with spell attacks.

                Barbarian: While in any unimproved square this unit gains a bonus to its combat strength equal to its level.

                Bard: This unit provides ¼ of its combat strength to all adjacent units. It can act as a general for up to 1 round per level if the army’s general is slain.

                Cleric: This unit may use spell attacks to heal friendly units for the same amount as the attack would normally damage enemy units.

                Druid: This unit treats all terrain as if plains for purposes of the amount of speed it has to spent to enter a square.

                Encrusted Berserker: This unit gains a bonus to combat strength equal to the amount of hit points it has lost during the current battle.

                Fighter: This unit suffers no penalties to fighting without a general or outside of a general’s area of influence.

                Haruspex: Once per encounter per level this unit may cause an enemy unit to reroll a combat strength roll and take the worse result.

                Incarnate: This unit, and all friendly units adjacent to it, are considered within a general’s area of influence, even if there is no friendly general on the field.

                Kher-Heb: This unit begins every battle with 2 scrolls that it can use normally, one with a healing spell and one with a damaging spell. The scrolls’ spell levels are equal to the highest level of spell the unit can cast. All scrolls this unit uses have their ranges increased by 2 when targeting a single unit with a ranged attack.

                Mage: This unit never runs out of spell attacks of a spell level equal to ¼ of its class level, minimum level 1.

                Monk: Whenever this unit deals damage with a melee combat roll, the damaged unit can only take one action on their next turn.

                Necromancer: Each time an adjacent enemy unit is destroyed this unit gains a cumulative +2 bonus to combat strength until the end of the encounter.

                Ninja: If this unit begins its turn adjacent to the enemy general (see Combat below), the general is slain.

                Paladin: When this unit is created, choose whether it is good or evil. It gains a +20% bonus to combat strength against enemy units of the opposite alignment.

                Prodigy: At the start of this unit’s turn, it gains a special bonus action. This action can only be used to do one of the following: deal 1 point of damage to an adjacent enemy unit, move itself to any unoccupied adjacent square, or heal 1 hit point of damage to itself.

                Ranger: This unit negates up to +25% combat strength bonus granted to enemy units from terrain, and never suffers a penalty to combat strength due to terrain.

                Rogue: If this unit is flanking an enemy unit, it gains a bonus to combat strength equal to its level against that unit.

                Sorcerer: This unit may make a spell attack that affects all adjacent squares, dealing damage like a melee spell attack.

                Stormlord: Beginning on this unit’s third turn in the encounter, all enemy units suffer a penalty to combat strength equal to this unit’s level.

                Technomancer: This unit is considered to be equipped with +1 magical longswords and heavy crossbows, +1 breastplates, and +1 heavy steel shields, automatically when created. These bonuses increase by +1 at every odd level. The unit cannot gain combat bonus from other magical or mundane equipment.

                War Dancer: This unit gains a bonus to speed equal to its level, and gains double the normal amount of combat strength from its level. It can also add both its Dexterity and Strength modifiers to its melee combat strength.

 

Military Unit Racial ChangesEdit

Each race brings something unique to the battlefield, altering units composed primarily of that race as seen below. If a unit has a large percentage of more than once race, whichever race is the majority is the one whose benefits apply. If there is a tie, choose upon unit creation.

 

                Avarta: This unit deals +1 damage with all spell attacks, and takes 1 less damage from all spell attacks.

                Dwarf: These units have 1 more HP than normal.

                Elf: If adjacent to no friendly units, this unit gains +2 combat strength.

                Gnome: These units gain a +1 bonus to combat strength for every 75gp of mundane equipment, instead of 100gp.

                Human: This unit requires 10% less experience to gain new levels.

                Jendau: This unit can add its Wisdom or Charisma modifier to its combat strength (both melee and ranged if the unit has both attack types). Additionally, it treats all squares as if they had a movement cost of 1.

                Lamni: Once per battle this unit can gain +100% to its combat strength until the beginning of its next turn. This unit also has +1 speed.

Moriedhel: These units’ range for ranged attacks is always 1 higher than normal.

                Wyldling: This unit can move through forest, jungle, and swamp squares as if they had roads in them, and always gain the combat strength bonus of these squares immediately upon entering them instead of having to begin the turn in the square to receive the benefit.


Combat Edit

Every empire has enemies, whether nearby rival empires, barbarian hordes, or even rebellions from within the empire’s own territory. Eventually your empire will need to defend itself, or you may want to conquer neighboring communities that belong to other empires to expand your borders. These situations are handled within the unit combat rules.

                Every season equates to one turn, so all units may take actions once per season, or four times per year.

                Every unit has two actions it can perform during a year, and all military unit actions are considered to be handled during the summer season. Below are the different action types that units can take.

                Move: The unit can move up to its speed (modified by the terrain it is entering, see above). A unit may take both of its actions as move actions if it wishes. Moving diagonally in a square-based map costs 1.5 times the normal movement points (similar to how character movement in this way works).

                Attack: The unit may attack another unit, a community, or another target using any one of its attack types (melee, ranged, or spell). A unit may only make one attack action per year. It can make an attack action before or after taking a move action. When attacking, the attacker and defender make opposed combat strength rolls. If the defender wins the roll, the attacker deals no damage (unless the defender is fortified, see below). If the attacker wins the roll, the defender takes damage equal to the difference between the rolls.

                Fortify: The unit digs in to its current location, gaining a 50% bonus to its defensive combat strength. This bonus is lost if the fortified unit makes any kind of move action, and the bonus does not apply to combat strength when attacking. A defending unit that is fortified always deals damage to the attacking unit as well. If the attacker wins the opposed roll, it takes 1 point of damage, but still deals damage to the defending unit as normal. If the defending unit wins the roll, it deals half the amount of damage it would deal if it had been attacking (rounded down, minimum 1). Note: the attacking unit must be within range of the defending unit’s attack type to take damage from a fortified defending unit (For example, if the attacking unit is firing arrows at the fortified unit, but the fortified unit has no ranged or spell attacks, it can deal no damage to the attacker.).

                Occupy: A unit may occupy an empty fort, friendly community, or other defensive structure. Doing so adds the structure’s combat strength to the unit’s as long as the unit remains occupying the structure. The unit must move onto the square the structure stands on before it can perform an Occupy action. Units with ranged combat strength scores gain +1 ranged combat strength while occupying a structure.

                Abandon: A unit may abandon an occupied structure. This places the unit in any desired adjacent square.

                Charge: A charge action allows a unit to move one square in any direction and then attack one adjacent enemy. The unit gains a +2 bonus to its combat strength for that attack, but then suffers a -2 to its combat strength until its next turn. If the unit cannot move into the desired square by spending only 1 movement point, it cannot charge in that direction. A unit can only charge once per turn.

 

GeneralsEdit

Adding another level of complexity to unit combat however is the empire’s generals. A general is typically found through adventuring or by attracting one through a strong Leadership score. A leader may act as a general himself if he wishes to. A general is considered a military unit but does not need a specific building to support him. An empire can only field a number of generals equal to its highest level community though.

                The general’s unit is typically a tiny sized unit that is composed of the general and his support staff, including messengers. Use the general’s race, class, and abilities to determine the unit’s abilities. In addition to this, the general has several special statistics: area of influence, command, and training scores.

                Area of Influence: This is the maximum range the general is effective at. The general’s benefits can only affect units within his area of influence. A general’s area of influence is a number of squares away from him equal to his ranks in Knowledge (Military Tactics). Only the general with the highest total score in Knowledge (Military Tactics) affects an area or a unit if more than one friendly general’s area of influence overlaps with another.

                Command: The general’s command score determines the maximum number of units that can benefit from the general. The general’s command score is equal to his ranks in Knowledge (Military Logistics).

                Training: This represents how much of a benefit affected units gain from the general. The training score can be split between combat strength and speed, but the general decides this split and it applies the same to all affected units. The general’s training score is equal to his ranks in Knowledge (Military Training). Alternatively the general can attempt to give enemy units (but not enemy communities or other structures) a penalty to speed or combat strength. He must split his total Training score between all desired penalties though. (For example, a general with a Training score of 10 wants to outmaneuver three enemy units. One of them is outside of his area of influence, so he focuses on the two he can affect. He can choose to give one of those units a -10 penalty to strength or speed, a -5 penalty to both, a -2 penalty to both units’ speed and a -3 penalty to both units’ strength, or however else he wishes to split up his Training of 10.) A general cannot both grant friendly units a bonus and enemy units a penalty in the same round unless he takes two Orders actions (see below).

 

                The General’s Combat Actions: A general receives two actions per turn, just like any other military unit. A general unit can take any of the common actions (see above), but also has a few special actions it can attempt.

                Orders: The general sends orders out to affected units within his area of influence. This action is required if the general wishes for units to benefit or suffer from his Training score and, if taken, the bonuses last until the general’s next turn.

                Bolster: The general rallies all adjacent units, removing their combat strength penalties caused by damage (see below). This lasts until the general’s next turn.

                Dispatch Emergency Reserves: The general sends out reserve troops to fill the ranks of wounded units. All affected units heal 1 hit point per 4 point of the general’s Training score (minimum 1). This action can only be taken once per encounter and takes both of the general’s actions that turn.

 

DamageEdit

As a unit takes damage and loses members, its combat effectiveness begins to decline. When the unit’s HP reaches 75% of its maximum it suffers a -2 penalty to its combat strength. It suffers a cumulative -4 and -6 penalty at 50% and 25% of maximum HP, respectively.

                Additionally if a unit is outside of the influence of a friendly general and is reduced to 25% or less of its maximum HP, it only receives one action per turn and must use that action as a move to move in a direction away from any nearby enemy units. If it cannot because it is surrounded, it is immediately destroyed as the unit surrenders. A unit does not suffer this morale loss if it is within the area of influence of a friendly general, even if it is not benefiting from the general’s Training score.

 

Community DefenseEdit

A community’s defense score is added to the combat strength of all units fighting within its area of influence. When multiple communities’ areas of influence overlap, only use the higher defense score. Additionally, a community may attack nearby hostile units, even without a military garrison present. The community may make ranged or melee attacks, and can attack up to 3 squares away. The community’s combat strength equals its defense score. Communities also ignore the first point of damage from any given attack, and an additional point of damage for every 5 points of defense score the community has.

                Communities can never gain a benefit from a general, but also do not suffer combat strength loss or the possibility of routing due to taking damage.

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.